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meet with, both in Hamburg and Berlin, death of the most famous Rabbi Akiba and Halle especially, and a few other Egar, a great many Jews come from the places; they ask, and deserve the sym- different provinces to Berlin, to be bappathy and prayers of British Christians, tised. There is no minister who has not who are so privileged of God as to dwell at least baptised some Jews; one minisin this land of Gospel light and true re- ter has received ninety-one into the ligious liberty.

church of Christ. If the English so

cieties would send them assistance, they Always respectfully yours,

would have part in the joy to receive the

children of Abraham into the covenant GEORGE BENNET.

of Christ. There is plenty to do among

the Jews of this country. State of Evangelical Religion in Ber

4. "The Society for Supporting Proselin and Prussia, communicated to

lytes has done a great deal to assist Rabbis George Bennet, at Berlin, by the

and other Jews that are under instrucRev. E. Kuntze, Minister of the

tion, to have them apprenticed to a trade, Orphan House, in Berlin, June 14,

and by this means furthered the object 1838.

of Christianising the Jewish nation. It 1. “The Prussian Bible Society has gets but little support from the Christian sixty-eight branch societies in different public; but it is quite indispensable for parts of the country, distributes about propagating the Gospel among the

Jews, 30,000 copies of the Bible, and 10,000 and is to be recommended to British copies of the New Testament annually. liberality. Besides the Prussian Bible Society, Dr. 5. The Prussian Religious Tract Pinkerton, as agent of the British and Society has published eighty different Foreign Bible Society, distributes about tracts, partly original, partly translaas many copies as the Prussian Bible tions and reprints. This society is more Society does, and gives every support active in later times than it was bethat is desirable ; and most thankfully fore, and gets some support now from has been received the grant of the North America to reprint some of the British and Foreign Bible Society, for old tracts. There are many opportuniprinting and distributing the New Tes- ties to distribute these tracts in the tament in the army. There would be country if they could be given away more done in the country, if the com- gratuitously, but there are not so many mittee of the Berlin Society would be that would buy some. prevailed upon

make use of some 6. "Primary Schools, as well as higher agents.

schools, are in this country under go2. “ The Missionary Society for Pro- vernment, and there are so many that pagating the Gospel among the Heathen we may dispense with the system of the has fifty-three branch societies, and an British and Foreign School Society. annual income of thirteen thousand dol. Parents are under the obligation enlars, about 20001. This society has sent forced by law to send their children to out nine missionaries to South Africa, school, from the age of seven years till and eleven are in the seminary; some they are fourteen. members of the society are building a "In the primary schools every child mission-house, the first building erected must have a Bible, Luther's Short Cateby public contributions, and attached to chism, and a reader; for the most part it is a large saloon for about six hun- also a hymn-book. dred persons to hold missionary meet- 7. “There is in later times a little ings. This society is increasing very more done by legislation to promote the much, and would be still more so, if it observance of the Sabbath, but the pracshould make use of agents in the coun- tice does not yet correspond with the try, as the missionary cause is not yet laws. every where known.

8. “There are eighteen ministers in 3. “ The Society for Promoting Chris- Berlin that preach according to the tianity among the Jews finds not so much Gospel of Christ; and salvation, justifisupport from the public, as the success of cation and sanctification only by him. this society claims. This society has only Several others may be called orthodox, two missionaries, of whom one is now without being lively with heart and disabled by sickness. But since the hand in the work of the Lord; and even

the wise men of this world, generally call- thing but dry morality, are almost ed rationalists, conform more and more empty. to Biblical doctrine. The churches are

(Signed)

“ E. Kuntze, best filled where the preachers hold forth

« Minister of the Orphan House, the cross; the others are very thinly at

in Berlin." tended: some, where they preach no- June 14th, 1838.

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The History of the REFORMATION of the

SIXTEENTH CENTURY, in GERMANY, SWITZERLAND, &c. By J. H. MERLE D'AUBIGNE, President of the Theolo. gical Society of Geneva, and Member of the “ Societé Evangelique.” 8vo. pp. 516.

D. Walther, 42, Piccadilly. The author of this deeply interesting work very justly observes, that “the history of the Reformation is altogether distinct from the history of Protestantism. In the former, all bears the character of a regeneration of human nature, a religious and social transformation emanating from God himself. In the latter, we see too often a glaring deprivation of first principles,-the conflict of parties,-a sectarian spirit, and the operation of private interests. The history of Protestantism might claim the attention of Protestants. The History of the Reformation' is a book for all Chris. tians, or rather, for all mankind.” With equal energy and truth, Mr. D. reminds his readers that the work he has “ undertaken is not the history of a party. It is the his. tory of one of the greatest revolutions ever effected in human affairs,—the history of a

mighty impulse communicated to the world three centuries ago, – and of which the operation is still every where discernible in our own days."-Speaking of the features which peculiarly distinguish the Reformation, our author has the following striking remarks:

“ The suddenness of its action is one of these characters of the Reformation. The great revolutions which have drawn after them the fall of a monarchy, or an entire change of political system, or launched the human mind in a new career of development, have been slowly and gradually prepared; the power to be displaced has long been mined, and its principal supports have given way. It was even thus at the intro. duction of Christianity. But the Reformation, at the first glance, seems to offer a different aspect. The Church of Rome is seen, under Leo the Tenth, in all its strength and glory. A monk speaks,-and in the half of Europe this power and glory suddenly crumble into dust. The Revolution reminds us of the words by which the Son of God announces his second advent:

As the lightning cometh forth from the west and shineth unto the east, so shall also the coming of the Son of man be.'

There is a fearless fidelity to truth about confined to one or more nations, but, on Mr. D.'s statements, which leads us to the contrary, affecting the world at large. augur much good from his writings. “Mo- The German Reformation is the true and dern Protestantism," he observes, “ like old fundamental Reformation. It is the great Catholicism, is, in itself, a thing from which planet, and the rest revolve in wider or nothing can be hoped,-a thing quite pow. narrower circles around it, like satellites erless. Something very different is neces- drawn after it by its movement. And yet sary to restore to men of our day the the Reformation in Switzerland must, in energy that saves. A something is requi. some respects, be considered as an excepsite, which is not of man, but of God. tion, both because it took place at the very Give me,' said Archimedes, “a point out same time as that of Germany, and indeof the world, and I will raise the world pendently of it; and because it bore, espefrom its poles.' True Christianity is this cially at a later period, some of those standing beyond the world, which lifts the grander features which are seen in the lat. heart of man from its double pivot of self- ter. Notwithstanding that recollections of ishness and sensuality, and which will one ancestry and of refuge, and the memory of day move the whole world from its evil way, struggle, suffering, and exile, endured in and cause it to turn on a new axis of right- the cause of the Reformation in France, eousness and peace.

give, in my view, a peculiar charm to the “ Whenever religion has been the subject history of its vicissitudes, I have nevertheof discussion, there have been three points less felt that I could not place it in the to which our attention has been directed : same rank as those which I have here God, man, and the priest. There can be spoken of. but three kinds of religion on this earth, “ From what I have said, it will be seen according as God, man, or the priest, is its that I believe the Reformation to be a work author or its head. I call that the religion of God. Nevertheless, as its historian, I of the priest, which is devised by the priest, hope to be impartial. I think I have for the glory of the priest, and in which a spoken of the principal Roman Catholic priestly caste is dominant. I apply the actors in the great drama, Leo X., Albert name of the religion of man to those sys. of Magdeburg, Charles V., and Dr. Eck, tems and various opinions framed by man's &c., more favourably than the majority reason, and which, as they are the offspring of historians. And, on the other hand, of his infirmity, are, by consequence, des- I have had no wish to conceal the faults titute of all sanative efficacy. I apply the and errors of the Reformers." words, religion of God,' to the truth, such From these extracts, our readers will be as God himself has given it, and of which able to judge for themselves of the high the object and the effect are God's glory and character of the work which we have now man's salvation.

the pleasure of introducing to their notice. "Hierarchism, or the religion of the It is the production of a most enlightened priest; Christianity, or the religion of and comprehensive mind, well equipped by God; Rationalism, or the religion of man: learning, philosophy, and research; but still such are the three doctrines which in our more highly equipped by a clear, penetratday divide Chrsitendom. There is no sal- ing knowledge of the word of God, and of vation, either for man or for society, in the degree in which human systems have hierarchism, or in rationalism. Chris. deviated from its sure and unerring lights. tianity alone can give life to the world ; Mr. D. is no copyist of the sayings or and, unhappily, of the three prevailing sys- writings of other men. He is an original tems, it is not that which numbers most thinker; and has taken upon himself the followers."

labour of going to the fountain head of Referring to the general design of his ecclesiastical knowledge. “This history," work, Mr. D. expresses himself in the fol. he observes, “has been drawn from the lowing manner :

original sources with which a long resiIt is the history of the Reformation dence in Germany has made me familiar. in general that I propose to write. I in- Down to this time, we possess no history tend to trace it among different nations, to of that remarkable period. Nothing indi. point out the same effects of the same cated that the deficiency would be supplied truths, as well as the diversities which when I commenced this work. This cir. take their origin in the varieties of na- cumstance could alone have led me to untional character. But it is in Germany dertake it; and I here allege it in my especially that we shall see and describe justification. The want still exists; and I the history of the Reformation. It is

pray Him, from whom cometh down every there we find its primitive type ;-—it is good gift, to cause that this work may, by there that it offers the fullest development his blessing, be made profitable to some of its organization :- it is there that it bears, who shall read it." above all, the marks of a revolution not We have long wished to see something

like an adequate view of the character of of remedy. The first business is to make the great German Reformer ; but in vain known the nature and the extent of the have we looked for this till the work before evil ; that once perceived, in this great us was put into our hands. Mr. D. has country there will not want either heads to realised our most sanguine desires ; he has plan or hands to accomplish all that is due gone into the very elements of Luther's to the rights of others, or the honour and history; he has traced the progress of his interest of England." mind, from the first dawnings of truth Such is Mr. Howitt's account of his own which fell upon it, till it stood forth in the labours; and we can honestly assure our full blaze of Gospel light, a kind of lumin- readers that there is no exaggeration in it. ary in the moral heavens.

With vast diligence and research he has Such is our estimate of Mr. D.'s labours, traced the history of European colonization, that we regard them as eminently fitted to and has unfolded a tale of horror, which confer a lasting benefit on the church of might well make those blush crimson who Christ. If the Protestant Papists of this have been guilty of the cruelties and opcountry would but read and ponder this pressions detailed. The motto of Mr. H.'s volume, it might prove an unspeakable work is a bitter sarcasm upon those problessing to them. Our apostolic-succession fessedly Christian nations which have taken men, and the many-coloured sections of the lead in the vast system of colonization. the professing church, which rank with “ Have we not one Father ? - hath not them, would do well to examine the stern one God created us? Why do we deal lessons of history which are here unfolded treacherously every man against his bro. to their view. They may here learn that ther ?" Well may our author say, “ It is the elements of the great Romish apostacy high time that we looked a little into our preare bound up in the specious pretensions tences. It is high time we examined, on the which they are now affecting to give forth evidence of facts, whether we are quite so reto the church as the truth of God. We fined, quite so civilised, quite so Christian, warn the rising clergy against the insidious as we have assumed to be. It is high time poison which the Oxford doctors are now that we look boldly into the real state of mingling in the cup of life ; and we call on the question, and learn actually whether the the disciples of our common Lord to stand mighty distance between our goodness and fast in the liberty wherewith Christ hath the moral depravity of other people really made them free; and not again to be en- exists. WHETHER, IN FACT, WE ARE tangled with that yoke of bondage which, CHRISTIAN AT ALL.

If ever," Mr. three hundred years ago, enchained all Eu- H. observes, “there was a quarter of the rope in the fetters of moral captivity. globe distinguished by its quarrels, its jea

lousies, its everlasting wars and bloodshed,

it is Europe. Since these soi-disant Chrisa COLONIZATION and CHRISTIANITY : a Po.

tian nations have arisen into any degree of pular History of the Treatment of the

strength, what single evidence of Christian

ity have they, as nations, exhibited ? EterNatives by the Europeans, in all their

nal warfare ?-is that Christianity! Yet Colonies. By William Howitt. 8vo.

that is the history of Christian Europe. Longman and Co.

The most subtle or absurd pretences to seize

upon each other's possessions,-the con“The object," observes Mr. Howitt, tempt of all faith in treaties,--the basest po. " of this volume is to lay open to the public licy,—the most scandalous profligacy of pubthe most extensive and extraordinary sys- lic morals, -- the most abominable internatem of crime which the world ever witness- tional laws !-are they Christianity? And ed. It is a system which has been in full yet they are the history of Europe. Nations operation for more than three hundred of men selling themselves to do murder, years, and continues yet in unabating acti- that ruthless kings might ravish each vity of evil. The apathy which has hitherto other's crowns-nations of men, standing existed in England upon this subject has with jealous eyes on the perpetual watch proceeded in a great measure from want of against each other, with arms in their knowledge. National injustice towards hands, oaths in their mouths, and curses in particular tribes, or particular individuals, their hearts ;-are those Christians ? Yet has excited the most lively feeling, and the there is not a man acquainted with the hismost energetic exertions for its redress; tory of Europe that will ever attempt to but the whole wide field of unchristian deny that that is the history of Europe. operations in which this country, more than For what are all our international boundaany other, is engaged, has never yet been ries ; our lines of demarcation ; our fronlaid in a clear and comprehensive view be- tier fortresses, and sentinels ; our martello fore the public mind. It is no part of the towers, and guard-ships; our walled and present volume to suggest particular plans gated cities ; our bastions and batteries ;

pp. 516.

There is a fearless fidelity to truth about confined to one or more nations, but, on Mr. D.'s statements, which leads us to the contrary, affecting the world at large. augur much good from his writings. “Mo. The German Reformation is the true and dern Protestantism," he observes, “ like old fundamental Reformation. It is the great Catholicism, is, in itself, a thing from which planet, and the rest revolve in wider or nothing can be hoped,-a thing quite pow- narrower circles around it, like satellites erless. Something very different is neces- drawn after it by its movement. And yet sary to restore to men of our day the the Reformation in Switzerland must, in energy that saves. A something is requi- some respects, be considered as an excepsite, which is not of man, but of God. tion, both because it took place at the very

Give me,' said Archimedes, ' a point out same time as that of Germany, and indeof the world, and I will raise the world pendently of it; and because it bore, espefrom its poles.' True Christianity is this cially at a later period, some of those standing beyond the world, which lifts the grander features which are seen in the lat. heart of man from its double pivot of self- ter. Notwithstanding that recollections of ishness and sensuality, aud which will one ancestry and of refuge, and the memory of day move the whole world from its evil way, struggle, suffering, and exile, endured in and cause it to turn on a new axis of right- the cause of the Reformation in France, eousness and peace.

give, in my view, a peculiar charm to the “ Whenever religion has been the subject history of its vicissitudes, I have nevertheof discussion, there have been three points less felt that I could not place it in the to which our attention has been directed : same rank as those which I have here God, man, and the priest. There can be spoken of. but three kinds of religion on this earth, “ From what I have said, it will be seen according as God, man, or the priest, is its that I believe the Reformation to be a work author or its head. I call that the religion of God. Nevertheless, as its historian, I of the priest, which is devised by the priest, hope to be impartial. I think I have for the glory of the priest, and in which a spoken of the principal Roman Catholic 'priestly caste is dominant. I apply the actors in the great drama, Leo X., Albert name of the religion of man to those sys- of Magdeburg, Charles V., and Dr. Eck, tems and various opinions framed by man's &c., more favourably than the majority reason, and which, as they are the offspring of historians. And, on the other hand, of his infirmity, are, by consequence, des- I have had no wish to conceal the faults titute of all sanative efficacy. I apply the and errors of the Reformers." words, religion of God,' to the truth, such From these extracts, our readers will be as God himself has given it, and of which able to judge for themselves of the high the object and the effect are God's glory and character of the work which we have now man's salvation.

the pleasure of introducing to their notice. “Hierarchism, or the religion of the It is the production of a most enlightened priest; Christianity, or the religion of and comprehensive mind, well equipped by God; Rationalism, or the religion of man : learning, philosophy, and research; but still such are the three doctrines which in our more highly equipped by a clear, penetrat. day divide Chrsitendom. There is no sal- ing knowledge of the word of God, and of vation, either for man or for society, in the degree in which human systems have hierarchism, or in rationalism. Chris- deviated from its sure and unerring lights. tianity alone can give life to the world ; Mr. D. is no copyist of the sayings or and, unhappily, of the three prevailing sys- writings of other men. He is an original tems, it is not that which numbers most thinker; and has taken upon himself the followers."

labour of going to the fountain head of Referring to the general design of his ecclesiastical knowledge. “This history," work, Mr. D. expresses himself in the fol. he observes, “has been drawn from the lowing manner :

original sources with which a long resia “ It is the history of the Reformation dence in Germany has made me familiar. in general that I propose to write. I in- Down to this time, we possess no history tend to trace it among different nations, to of that remarkable period. Nothing india point out the same effects of the same cated that the deficiency would be supplied truths, as well as the diversities which when I commenced this work. This cir. take their origin in the varieties of na. cumstance could alone have led me to untional character. But it is in Germany dertake it; and I here allege it in my especially that we shall see and describe justification. The want still exists; and I the history of the Reformation. It is pray Him, from whom cometh down every there we find its primitive type ;-it is good gift, to cause that this work may, by there that it offers the fullest development his blessing, be made profitable to some of its organization :—it is there that it bears, who shall read it." above all, the marks of a revolution not We have long wished to see something

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