Pagina-afbeeldingen
PDF
ePub

what that means. There is a party among to the world a feeble embodiment of their us who not only like Germany and hate worst faults. France, but who entirely disbelieve in The truth is, we suspect, that France France, who talk of her degeneracy, and has leaders, as North Germany also has, in their hearts imagine that her rôle is who are little seen by the public. The played out. Let them just consider what immensely numerous bureaucracy which she has done. After the most frightful covers the country has, ever since the defeat of modern times, with a third of Revolution at all events, played in France her territory in invader's hands, with her the part of a great and popular aristoccapital in insurrection, and her available racy. We are accustomed in this counarmy all required to restore order, she try to think of Préfets and Sous-Préfets, has paid a fine equal to one fourth the and all the rest of the French officials, as British National Debt, has elected a bour-mere oppressors, agents of a bad system, geois of genius to her head, has obeyed weighing heavily on the resources of the him on points on which she disagreed | Treasury ; but the people subject to them with him, has suffered her already severe regard them in a very different light, as taxation to be increased one fourth, and the arbiters between them and the rich. has endured a foreign occupation without Not only is tradition in their favour once giving a pretext for real severity. and tradition tells among every populaWe all here in England admire M. Thiers, tion except the urban English — but their and think he has shown tact and firmness, /functions tell. They act to a degree and above all courage, in his administra- which we English, with our free system tion, but what would his efforts have pro- of life, scarcely comprehend as protectors duced without the assistance of France of the people, as the unpaid lawyers to herself ? It is the people, not M. Thiers, whom under all circumstances they can who have remained so quiet, and sub-appeal for advice, and assistance, and scribed such loans, and borne such taxa- guidance in the affairs of life. We think tion; who have suppressed discontents of them by instinct as oppressors, but of the most bitter kind, and have had the they are not bad people at all, but persons instinct to see that in a little chirrupy | superior to the mass, efficient, kindly, bourgeois of genius they had found the and in short very like the good sort of best available ad interim chief. We do lawyers among ourselves. They are quite not know a more remarkable instance of capable of forming an opinion, and they that quality which makes up for so many have formed one "that her Majesty's deficiencies, the political sense which Government must go or," that the mighty seems to be given, like the capacity for and on the whole successful machine resisting malaria, to some races, and not called French Administration must go to others. The people had no visible forward, that it must have a head, who chiefs. The most striking fact in the had better be M. Thiers, and that the history of France since 1870 is that she people must just endure till better times has not produced men ; that nobody can come round. There never was a case in point to any local leader ; that there is history in which the officials adhered no one except M. Gambetta either to suc- so honestly to a man and a scheme of ceed or to oppose M. Thiers; that the government which most of them must Head of the State and the masses always hate, or so honestly used their influence seem to be standing face to face. The among the population. Very few are M. people seem to have done it all them- | Thiers' nominees, and those few are not selves, to have developed for themselves exactly devotees of his, but all have acthe capacity for obedience which was cepted his ordre du jour to get rid of the the one thing required by the situation. Germans quietly, and then see. Most of They have submitted of their own heads them, of course, are placemen, anxious to – for, except in Paris and Lyons, there get on. Many of them are mere placehas been little coercion — to do precisely men, careful mainly to get on. Some of the things needful to be done, but which them, we dare say, are mere rascals, wilthey were expected to resist doing. No ling to sell their country, if only they may leader, whatever his genius, unless in- get on. But the immense majority are deed he had a genius for war, could civilians, exactly like the civilians of any have guided them better than they have other country, rather exceptionally able guided themselves, while none could have as compared with the population, and been obeyed more implicitly than they with what is unusual, hearty and honest have obeyed an Assembly which seems confidence from the people about them, to whom they give the word,” just as / where, and by the clergy in some Catholic aristocrats and journalists do in England, countries, and in one Protestant country to the injury, it may be, of independent Scotland, to this hour. thought, but to the indefinite gain of the Will the early liberation of the French people in the way of political coherence. territory affect Europe ? Not much. We English know that in a severe politi- After the most careful watching of all cal crisis, we mean a real crisis, and not that has been revealed in the past three the comparatively trivial trouble we are years, the conclusion at which we arrive accustomed to call such, we should act is definitely this. The majority of Frenchon the opinion of a few hundred men ; men are willing to run an immense risk and so do the French, and the reason in to revindicate their territory and as they each case is the same. We leave to a think to re-establish their honour or their Parliament outside Westminster the gen-prestige, which for them is the same eral decision upon details, and so do the thing. But the official class, which acts French, though their outside Parliament as their fugleman, though honourably and ours happens to be different in origin bitter with the circumstances, is nererand ways. We have the advantage that theless accustomed to politics, able to enours is independent, honestly thinks for dure adversity, and doubtful about exitself in its own unideaed way. They have treme courses. It will advise the people, the advantage that their outside Parlia- that is the Assembly, that is the Presiment knows and feels difficulties of the dent, be it whom it may, to fight, if there practical kind, is unusually moderate, and is a chance. If a Russian alliance seemed comprehends the necessity of sacrifice, certain, there would be war. If a British which, indeed, it is a little too ready to alliance were certain — we beg Mr. Gladpress on those it guides. The intellect- stone's pardon for suggesting such an ual electorate, in fact, the electorate which idea - there would be war. But failing directs the actual electors is efficient, can aid of those kinds, the French Official in a rough way comprehend the political idea, which is the French governing idea, necessities of the hour, and can induce is to wait, to see this wonderful group of the mass of the people to accede to neces- Germans disappear, as it shortly must, for sary but disagreeable sacrifices. That there is not a young man in it, and to this ultimate electorate should be official make the quarrel historic, merely settling is, of course, to Englishmen a strange in their own minds as a fixed and immovfact, but we are not certain that it is an able idea that France must have Metz, unique one. The same thing is true of Lorraine, and compensation for Alsace. Prussia, where, if official etiquette al- If she has to wait twenty years, twenty lowed, the people would constantly re- years do not matter much in the history turn officials as representatives ; of North of a nation. The hour will come, and the Italy, where officials are distinctly popu- genius will come, and when they come, lar; and we are told, though we do not so that is the work first of all to be carried well know, of Spain, where society, which out. That seems to us the temper not so always seems to be dissolving, is held to- much of France, or of her rulers, as of gether by the influence of Committees or the persons who permanently lead Juntas, whose centre is always on inquiry Frenchmen, who are almost unknown, found to be an official. In short, in mod- and who, as the history of three years has ern Europe officials play the part played shown, are neither the idiots nor the opby aristocrats in the olden times every-Ipressors Englishmen are apt to suppose.

HALF truths are very attractive to some / tion of error - that is, in contraction - as in minds. They admit of forcible statement, comprehension; in the taking of what is true in from the absence of all attempt at modifica- error into our truth. tion, and they appear to possess simplicity and Another way of stating this is, that error is unity. They can be overcome not by the other always more or less superficial, and the only half-truth, but by the presentation of the effectual way of supplanting it is to go deeper. whole.

| The mine, as in military matters, is best met Truth consists not so much in the elimina-I by the countermine. Thoughts by the Way.

[ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

Recently placed under new editorial management, brings to the support of its columns increased aid of material from both English and foreign resources, considerably more interesting and important to educated readers generally, than is contained in any other single publication DOW accessible to the American public.

Among those who contribute are
President CHADBOURNE, of Williams College;
Ex-President WOOLSEY, of Yale;
President BARNARD, of Columbia;
President ANDREW D. WHITE, of Cornell University;
President PORTER, of Yale;
Professor Alex. WINCHELL, Michigan University;

Professor Moses Coit Tyler, of Michigan University;
Professor C. H. HITCHCOCK, of Dartmouth;
Professor JOHN BASCOM, of Williams;
Professor J. P. LACROIX, of Ohio Wesleyan University;
Professor OLIVER MARcy, of Northwestern University;
Professor JAMES D. DANA. of Yale;
Professor A. E. DOLBEAR, of Bethany;

Professor J. B. SEWALL, of Bowdoin; And many others, including eminent college professors and the best literary talent in the country.

It contains educational views from all parts of the world; full intelligence and criticisms of new books; the best items of intelligence, and discussion from English and foreign journals. Editorials, on a variety of topics interesting to educated persons, and carefully prepared notes.

The following are recent notices of the COURANT:

" THE COLLEGE COURANT comes to us this and colleges, but with the course of opinion, week announcing a change of editorship. It learning, and criticism, and the development of is evident that an earnest and scholarly editor the best ideas in our educational system. It has assumed the reins.” - The Independent. will be especially valuable to teachers and in"THE COLLEGE COURANT promises to in

intelligent students.” — Washington Chronicle. crease largely its importance and value under “THE COLLEGE COURANT announces a change the nevy editorship. Its chief care will be to in its editorial department, and enlarged plans mark the development of the system of higher for the improvement of the paper. It has long education, and to reflect as completely as ceased to be simply an undergraduate's sheet, may be the progressing changes in the fields and devoted to the local interests of Yale Colof letters, science and art. It addresses itself, lege. It is far the best paper devoted to the therefore, to all people of culture, and espe- subject of education generally, and to Univercially to the nation's educators, journalists, sity training in all its phases. The new meateachers, and the college community.” — The sures proposed will tend to make it a necessary N. Y. Evening Mail.

aid to all personally interested in the work of " THE COLLEGE COURANT, published at

academic training. We can heartily commend New Haven, is one of the best publications in

in it to our readers.” — Zion's Herald, Boston. the country, as an organ of the higher institu- “There is no doubt that the new editorial tions of culture. It contains much choice mat- management will do all that fine scholarship, ter, carefully gathered from English and for high purpose, and indefatigable industry can eign sources, and discussions and criticisms of do. We expect to see THE COURANT take its the higher topics of the day, with reference place among the few journals which no man or especially to education and letters. It deals woman of thorough education can afford to not merely with the conduct of universities I neglect.” — The Index, Toledo, Ohio.

The subscription price of the COURANT is $4.00 a year, or will be sent on trial three months

for $1.00. Single copies ten cents. For sale by all newsdealers. Address,

PUBLISHERS “COLLEGE COURANT,"

[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

THE EGLECTIC REVIEW

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[subsumed][subsumed][ocr errors][subsumed]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[subsumed][ocr errors]
[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]
« VorigeDoorgaan »