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Al flesh had corrupted its way, is the when he speaks of Christ, by the Spirit, testimony of eternal truth; but, adds the preaching to the spirits in prison when the sacred writer, Noah was perfect in his long-suffering of God waited in the days of generation. He had, of course, after the Noah. His meaning is, that as with every translation of Enoch, no one with whom other true minister of righteousness, Christ he could take sweet counsel. The com- was with Noah, by his Spirit, and put munion of saints, a privilege with us so words into his mouth, whereby those whom common that we are apt to underrate its God had condemned to destruction (called value, was to him unknown. There were spirits in prison) were yet allowed space none to unite with him in singing God's for repentance; and had held out to them praises, or to join him in offering prayer the way of escape from the threatened to the Father of all his mercies. You may destruction. To them for the space of get some tangible idea of the meaning of one hundred and twenty years Noah the phrase, in his generation, by for a mo- preached. ment supposing yourself placed in the The mantle of the ascended Enoch had midst of the dreary darkness of a heathen fallen upon him; and while his example land. There, solitary and friendless, take gave evidence of the possibility of even up your residence. The sky is bright then serving God with a perfect heart, his above you. Inanimate nature is all beauti- warning voice is lifted up among the floods ful. The flowers and fruit proclaim God's of the ungodly, whom he invites and enhandiwork. The birds, on quivering treats to forsake their evil ways, and return wing, are echoing his praises. Yea, every to their Creator and their God. Indeed, it prospect pleases, and only man is vile. is impossible to conceive circumstances All around this loveliness is spread the pall more unfavorable to the practice of piety of desolation : the milk of human kindness than those in which this man was placed, is unknown, or changed into the bitterness and his conduct will ever remain a standof gall; the endearing associations that ing reproach to those professors of recluster around the name of mother are un- ligion who, because of the obstacles in known : parents, in the startling language their way, faint and grow weary in wellof the apostle, are without natural affec- doing. tion: their throat is an open sepulcher : Let us now turn our attention to the the poison of asps is under their lips : notice taken of this man by the Almighty. their feet are swift to shed blood : the very Alone as he was, and unsuccessful as his atmosphere is redolent with oaths, and preaching appears to have been, God saw cursings, and blasphemy. In the midst of him. Thee have I seen, says the Great all this, God's own voice proclaims to his Jehovah. The world heeded him not; servant Noah, Thee have I seen righteous perchance they ridiculed him; what then? before me in this generation; and the testi- He continued unfaltering in his course. mony of the historian does but confirm this They regarded not his warning voice; declaration when he says, Noah was per- they were eating and drinking, says Jesus fect.

Christ, marrying and giving in marriage, Let it be observed, too, that not only and knew not until the flood came and was Noah without associates in his deeds took them all away. What then? Noah's of piety, he was also without that clear soul was doubtless grieved within him at revelation which we have in the sacred their impenitence and impending danger, Scriptures. In contrast with our privi- but his soul was kept in perfect peace; leges, his was but the twilight, in opposi- his record was with his God. In the tion to the full blaze of a meridian sun. strong and striking language of the histoThere was no Bible in his day. Equally rian, he walked with God. What is imwith ourselves, also, he had the cares and plied in this expression ? Evidently, on anxieties incident to humanity. He was the part of Noah, progressive piety; he the father of a family, and was doubtless walked. But he walked with God; imconcerned for their temporal as well as plying that God was with him. The figure spiritual and eternal welfare.

is taken from the journeying together of The New Testament opens to us another two friends; they pass on, by mutual contrait in his character. He was, says St. versation they beguile the tediousness of Peter, a preacher of righteousness; and to the way; and O! what a Friend was that! his preaching, the apostle evidently refers | Well might Noah say, with one in a later

me.

IT

age, I will fear no evil, for thou art with

AWFUL FATE OF A PIRATE SHIP. We shall devote another paper to the was a terrible storm. The wind, with history of Noah, to the Deluge, and to all the awful accompaniments of rain, the re-peopling of our world by his de- hail, rattling thunders, and fiercely glaring scendants. In the meantime let us regard lightnings, had burst down upon the liquid the character of this eminent preacher plains of the startled deep, in all the fury of righteousness as an example for our of a tropical tornado. The black heavens imitation. We are not to look upon him were in terrific commotion above ; and the as a bright sun shining afar off and dazzling smitten and resilient waters, as if to escape by his splendor. He was just and perfect, the impending wrath of the aroused sister and walked with God. How was he en elements, were fleeing in galloping mountabled to do this? He found grace in the ains athwart the surface of the boiling eyes of the Lord. The same grace we ocean beneath. too may find, for God is rich in grace Could aught human, or aught of human toward all that call upon him. If he at- construction, be here, now, and survive? tained in that twilight of God's gracious It would seem an utter impossibility; and dispensation this elevated character ; if in yet it was so. Amid all this deafening that era of darkness he walked with God; din of battling elements, that were filling if, when every example around him was

the heavens with their uproar and lashing evil and only evil continually, he was en the darkened ocean into wild fury and abled to maintain the character of a just commotion, a stanch - built West India man, O what excuse can there be found merchant-ship was seen, now madly plungfor us if we seek not that grace whereby ing into the troughs of the sea, and now we also in this day of light may be enabled quivering like a feather on the towering to follow in the path marked out by him : waves, or scudding through the flying the path in which the Saviour's footsteps spray with fearful velocity before the shine. And there is no higher dignity, howling blast. no brighter eulogy than that which we On her flush deck, and lashed to the may all through God's grace attain, when helm, with the breaking waves dashing it may be said of us : Mark the perfect around his feet, and the water dripping man, and behold the upright! And when from the close cap and tightly-buttoned death shall close our career on earth, we pea-jacket in which he was garbed, stood can leave behind no legacy more valuable her gallant master, in the performance of or more endearing for our children and our a duty which he, true to his responsibility, fellow-men, than the siinple inscription would intrust to no other, in such an hour upon the stone which marks our last rest as this—that of guiding his storm-tossed ing-place : He walked with God. That bark among the frightful billows that were answers all questions relative to our des- threatening every instant to ingulph her. tiny and our dwelling-place on the other Thus swiftly onward drove the seemingly side of Jordan's swelling flood. Now it is : devoted ship, strained, shivering, and Lo, I am with you always; then it is : So groaning beneath the terrible power of the shall we be ever with the Lord. Forever! | gale, like an over-ridden steed, as she in the language of a recent author, to be dashed, yet unharmed, through the mist with him a few years as John and Peter and spray and constantly-breaking white were ; to be with him one Lord's day, as caps of the wildly-rolling deep; thus onthe beloved disciple was; to be with him ward sped she, for the full space of two a few moments, as Paul caught up into hours, when the wind gradually lulled, and the third heavens was; how blessed! but with it the deafening uproar subsided. to be ever with the Lord, not only to-day, Presently a young, well-dressed gentleman but to-morrow; nay, neither to-day nor to- made his appearance on deck, amidships, morrow, but now, now, one everlasting and, having noted a while the now evident now! Beautifully sings the poet in the subsidence of the tempest, slowly and carewell-known lines :

fully, from one grasped rope to another,

made his way to the side of the captain “Forever with the Lord !

at the wheel.
Amen; so let it be.
Life from the dead is in that word;

A frightful blow, Mr. Elwood,” said 'Tis immortality.”

the latter ; “ for the twenty years I have

been a seaman, I have never seen the race-horse the ship must be driving ahead! like.”

I looked not ten minutes ago, and nothing " It certainly has exceeded all my con- was to be seen; and now there is the ceptions of a sea-storm," said the other. headland, in full view, but two or three “ But do you know where we are, and leagues distant! And stay-what is that where driving at this tremendous speed ?" | dark object around and a little beyond the

“Yes, I think I do both. When we point? A ship? Yes, it grows distinct were struck by the gale, which I saw was now-a large, black ship. That, sir, is going to be a terrible norther, and saw it, an American frigate. Hurra to you, Eltoo, very luckily, at a distance that enabled wood! We will now soon be safe, and in me to become well prepared for it, look at safe company." my reckoning, and make all my calcula- ! It was about sunset. The merchanttions—when we were struck, we were man, having passed the protecting promonthree hundred and fifty miles out of Ha- tory, and swept around the tall ship of war, vana, north'ard, and about forty from the had gained an offing, about a half mile American coast. I at once put the ship beyond, under the lee of a thickly-wooded, before the wind, and set her course south- long, narrow island ; and was now lying east, which, being perfectly familiar with snugly at anchor, riding out the heavy these seas, I knew would give her a safe ground-swell occasioned by the abated run, and, in about sixty miles, carry her storm ; while all on board, unsuspicious of by the southern point of the Little Bahama molestation, were making preparations to Bank, where, rounding this great break- turn in for the night. water against northers, we should be in a “A sail to the leeward !" shouted a comparatively smooth sea, that would ad- sailor, just sent aloft to make some alteramit of either laying to or anchoring. It tion in the rigging. is now over two hours since we started on The word was passed below; and the this fearful race, which has kept my heart captain, mates, and Elwood, were instantly in my mouth the whole time; and I am on deck, and on the look-out. They at expecting, every minute, to get sight of once descried a large black schooner, that rocky headland.”

creeping out from behind the farther end “ But that,” rejoined Elwood, « will of the island against which they were anbring us, according to the late rumor, intochored, about a mile distant, and tacking one of the principal haunts of the pirates, and beating her way toward them. She will it not ?"

carried no colors by which her character " Yes, partly, perhaps," replied the cap- could be determined ; but the very absence tain ; " but I hear that Commodore Porter of all such insignia, together with the sinhas arrived, with the American squadron, ister appearance of her long, low sides, in these seas, to break up these pests, and which exhibited the aspect of masked portI presume has done it, or frightened them holes, and also the peculiar stir of her away, so that we shan't be molested. At large and strange-looking crew, at once any rate, I saw no safer course to outlive marked her as an object of suspicion. such a tempest. You are the owner of | “Elwood, your fears were prophetic,” ship and cargo, to be sure ; but you put on said the captain, lowering his glass from a me the responsibility of her safety.” long, intent observation. “That craft is

“ Certainly," rejoined the other, “ for a pirate, with scarce a shadow of doubt. my guidance would be a poor one; and, | But don't the mad creature see the frigate, instead of any disposition to criticise your and the frigate her ?" course, Captain Golding, I feel but too With this, they all turned toward the

stake, to say nothing of my own, and so A narrow vein of land fog, put in motion much property, that your skill has enabled by some local current in shore, had been us to outride the storm-now nearly over, wafted out on to the water, and completely I think—so unexpectedly well. But what enshrouded her from their view. is that, a little to the left of the ship's “I see it all,” exclaimed Elwood. course, in the distance ahead ?”

| " That pirate has been lying, all the after"Ah, that is it !" cheerily exclaimed noon, concealed behind this island ; and the captain, casting an eager look in the his spies, sent into the woods on the island, indicated direction. “Why, how like a l and to this end of it, probably saw both

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our ship and the frigate take their positions, the only alternative, stood, with knitted and this intervening fog coming on, and re brows and fire-arms cocked and leveled, ported all to their master ; who at once silently awaiting the onset. It came. conceived the bold design which he has With the shock of the partial collision as now started out to execute—that of snatch- the assailing craft raked along the sides ing us, as its prize, from under the very of their ship, and the sudden jerk as she guns of the frigate!"

was brought up by the quickly-thrown grapA brief, earnest consultation was then ples, the pirate captain, with a fierce shout held, when, knowing the uselessness of of defiance, cleared, at a single bound, the trying to signalize the frigate, they first intervening rails, and landed, with brandthought to weigh anchor and try to escape ished sword, upon their fore-deck. А to her protection; but a little reflection dozen more, with a wild yell, were in the told them the enemy would be down upon act of following, when they were met by a them before this could be effected, and full volley from the guns of the defenders, they would be taken, unprepared for de- poured into their very faces.

There was fense. The only other alternative left a pause-a lurch-a crack of breaking them was, therefore, quickly adopted ; and fixtures; and the next moment the schoon. in pursuance, the second mate and two er, torn away from her fastenings by the seamen were lowered in the life-boat, with force of a monstrous upheaving wave, and orders to keep the ship between themselves thrown around at right angles to the unand the schooner till they got into the harmed prey so nearly within her clutches, screening fog, and then make their way, was seen rolling and reeling on the top of with all speed, to the frigate, to invoke a billow, fifty yards distant. At that inher aid and protection; while all the rest stant, twenty jets of blinding flame fiercely should arm themselves with the muskets, | burst from the edge of the fog-cloud, alswords, and pistols on board, and, if pos- most within pistol-shot to the windward, sible, hold the enemy at bay till succor ar and, with the startling flash, rent sky and rived. And scarcely had these hasty prep ocean leaped as with the concussion of a arations been made, before the piratical closely-breaking volley of linked thunderschooner, which had made a wide tack peals. There was another and still more outward to catch the wind, came swiftly awful pause ; when, through the clouds of sweeping round to their side, like a tower sulphurous smoke that was rolling over ing falcon on his prey. But, by some them, the astounded defenders heard the miscalculation of her helmsman, she went gurgling rush, as of waters breaking into twenty yards wide of them-not, however, newly opened chasms, in the direction of without betraying the full extent of her the enemy; and they comprehended all. bloody purposes; for as, under the impulse The frigate, unperceived by the eager of a speed she found herself unable instantly pirates, had dropped down, rounded to, to check, she swept by on the long, rolling and sent a whole broadside directly into billows, a score or two of desperate ruffians, the uprolled hull of the devoted craft, headed by their burly and still more fierce-which had been reduced to a sinking wreck looking captain, stood on her deck, armed by that one tremendously heavy discharge to the teeth, and holding their hooks and of terrible missiles. Within two minutes hawsers, ready to grapple and board their the lifting smoke disclosed her, reeling and intended prey.

But, still forbearing to lurching for the final plunge. Within one unmask their batteries or fire a gun, lest more, she rose upright, like some mortallythey should thus bring down the frigate smitten giant, quivered an instant, and, upon them, her grim and silent crew sprang with all her grim and hideously-screeching to their posts, to tack ship and come round crew, went down, stern foremost, amid the again, with the narrowest sweep, to repair parting waves of the boiling deep. their former mischance. And, with surprising quickness, their well-worked craft Our friendships hurry to short and poor was again, and this time with no uncertain conclusions, because we have made them a guidance, shooting alongside of the devoted texture of wine and dreams, instead of the merchantman. Still the crew of the lat- tough fiber of the human heart. The laws ter quailed not; but, well knowing there of friendship are great, austere, and eternal, was no longer any hope of escaping of one web with the laws of morals and of struggle in which death or victory was nature.- Goethe.

Vol. XI.-4

a

And saw it eat the air for food."

W the

CHAMELEONS ALL.

against the decency, the propriety, or the

wholesomeness of animal flesh, turns from "Stretch'd at its ende the beast I view'd,

it with simulated loathing, and turns heart

ily to his mushes, his puddings, and his THEN we ask the student why he fruits.

So, the visible house of the spirit is lems in solitude, apart from the enjoyments built up out of apparently the most inconof life; the soldier, why he has allowed gruous materials, but science proves that himself to be subjected to the toil and dust these varying forms are all constituted of of his extra-dangerous trade; the busy one or several similar substances ; that merchant, to what purpose he assiduously the whole of the multitudinous quantities strives to equalize supply and demand over which environ us yield but sixty-one elethe earth; nay, even when we ask of the mentary substances. But four alone of criminal why in the practice of crime he these bear an essential part of what we dares an ignominious death, we receive call organic existence. The two chief one answer from all, which, though ex constituents of the atmosphere are nitropressed in phrase characteristic of each, gen and oxygen. The latter and hydrogen is essentially the same: “What can we constitute water, the latter and nitrogen do ? we cannot help it; a man can not united form ammonia, a volatile alkali, a live upon air.” The answer appears to kind of air which streams forth in great furnish an explanation; and even the judge abundance through the mountain chimneys is frequently so persuaded of the validity of subterranean fires. of the plea, that he allows it to dictate These four, of which three are airs or leniency.

gases, with carbon, a “solid,” when comBut then comes the naturalist, an im-bined form all the materials of plants or practicable kind of man, who will recog- animals—the organic" world. The most nize no truth but that which he can prove important and general of the compounds experimentally, and says, “ You can live of these elements are water, which perupon air ; nay, in fact, man lives on air vades the atmosphere as vapor; and caralone, and nothing else whatever.” When bonic acid and ammonia, which are diffused we put the question, What do men really in the atmosphere as gases ; and on the live upon ? the answers will be various. examination of these three compounds of The Guacho who, in the immense pampas the four elements turns the complete study of Buenos Ayres, in swift career lassos of animal and vegetable life. The comthe guanaco, or the wild bull, dayly swal mon air is about four-fifths of nitrogen, lows ten pounds of the flesh of his game, and one-fifth of oxygen, one two-thouonly occasionally varied by a moiety of sandth of carbonic acid, and less than that pumpkin. Bread is not known to him. amount of ammonia. The Irish peasant regales himself on a For every inch of oxygen he inspires, a meager supply of "potatoes and point.” | man expires a cubic inch of carbonic acid Meat is strange to him, and he is happy if The same exchange occurs in the process occasionally he can add a herring to savor of combustion ; and according to the comthe mealy tubers. The Greenlander, in putation of Poggendorf, about twelve thouhis smoky, fetid hut, beneath unsostening sand five hundred cubic geographical miles snows, revels in the“ blubber” of a stranded of carbonic acid gas have been expired in a whale or captured seal. There the glisten- period of five thousand years, exclusive ing, unctuous black sucks the sugar cane of vast quantities which rise from the voland swallows the banana ; and there the canic chimneys. According to this estiSiamese swells himself with monstrous mate, the carbonic acid of the atmosphere quantities of rice; the Abyssinian with should now be to oxygen as one to one great chunks of raw flesh quickly dismem- hundred and fifty-five, but in fact actually bered from the yet sentient, vital carcass measured, it is found to ansount to oneof a brute ; and the Esquimaux drinks in fourth per cent. From this it is evident his brimming fill of warm fish oil. Here that some process prevails which transfers the Pekin «gourmand zests it on his the carbonic acid into other relations. fattened rat, and imbibes his “bird-nest” Oxygen is combined and continually combroth; and then the “dietetic reformer" | bines with every terrestrial substance, but emphatically, nay, vehemently protesting conspicuously so with carbon and hydro

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