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Recent Publications....90, 186, 281, 377, 473, 567 Terror, A Night of...........

51

Times, The Great Want of the....

328
Serpent, Hugged by a By a Canadian

Tracks in the Bush ; or, the Lost One Found 528

Farmer...

139

Try your friends.......

141

Silk Moth, The-G. M'Clelland Miller....... 234
Shepherds of Les Bas Landes, The.... 113 United States Mint, The.........

404

Sketches of Colonial History-S. Luckey.... 508 Unreasonable Jealousy; or, a Lesson for

Small Change...........88, 184, 279, 375, 470, 564

Young Wives.......

165

Soul, Mysterious Faculties of the...

268

246

Spirits, An Evening with the-A. D. Field, 555 Vail, Behind the......

366
Southern Australia, Sketches in........

Vegetable Distribution.........

158

Vesuvius, Ascending Mount....

249

Spicewood Moth, The, George M'Clelland
Miller........
506 Wehrwolves....

123
Steam-Engine scientifically considered, The 254 Wicked Old Woman in the Woods, The-J.B. 452
Stephenson, George, the Railway Engineer, 435 Woman's Devotedness; or, the Wife of the
Switzerland, Recollections of — From the Palatinate.......

23

French......

7 | World at Large, The.......192, 286, 383, 479, 571

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

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The Hon. John M'Lean.......

The Steam Engine scientifically considered
Swiss Peasants and the Alpine Horn.......... 7

-(2 eng.)

254

Swiss Maid and Matron......

8 Riverside Cemetery, Waterbury...... 289

Scene on board a Geneva Steamboat....

9 Lower Pond, Riverside...

292

Peasants of the Mountains..

10 Porter's Lodge, Riverside Cemetery.

293

A Cretin........

11 Mitchell's Family Lot......

294

A Victim of the Goiter.....

11 Sketch on Forest Hill......

294

Monks, according to Romance...............

12 St. John's Church......

295

The Monk as he really is......

13 Second Congregational Church..

296

A Parlor in the Convent of St. Bernard... 14 New Roman Catholic Church.....

297

Meteoric Showers in Greenland..

16 Death opening to Immortality..

299

Arnold, the Bearded Boy....

20 Varied Monkey, or Mona ......

302

The Bell and the Blessing.....

21 Entellus Monkey, or Hoonuman.

303

Industrial School for Girls, Norfolk, Mass.... 58 Chachma and Marmozet...

304

Scenes from the Pleasures of Hope--(4 eng.) 60 Acchus Pencillatus and Auritus..

305

Abel Stevens.........

97 Cæsar Ducornet...

308

White Mice.......

101 The Graves of Wordsworth and his Relatives, 348

The Zerda of Sennaar..

102 Birmingham

385

Guepard, or Hunting Tiger........

103 Derby..

388

The Winged Pea.....

105

Public Square, Birmingham......

389

Brusa.....

106 Episcopal Church and Parsonage, Birming-

Village of Nichori..

108 ham.....

392

Mausoleum of the Sultan Murad.....

109 | The Old Man's Home-(4 eng.).

393

The Evening Walk..

112 The Robber Crab (Birgus Latro)

The Shepherds of Les Bas Landes.. 113 Fanpi arrested by the Mandarin..

448

The Bouquet.........

115 Embarkation of Camels....

481

A Family of the Homeless at Work............ 153 Dromedary from Lower Egypt................. 484

The Homeless on a Journey.

154 Becharieh Dromedary..

485

Preparations for a Meal...

155 Wrestling Camel, from Asia Minor.......... 487

Man of South Australia.......

158 The Village Church on Christmas Day. 489

Woman of South Australia...

159 Heigh ho, the Holly .....

490

Center Square, Waterbury..

193 Indian Well....

492

Exchange Place, Waterbury.

196 Confluence of the Naugatuck with the Hou-

Scovill House, Waterbury.

197 satonic at Derby...

493

Methodist Church, Waterbury..

198 Humphreysville

494

Rock Dell, Riverside Cemetery.

199 General Humphreys.......

495

The Bridge, Riverside Cemetery..

200 General Humphreys delivering the Flags

The Orang Outang...

202 taken at Yorktown....

498

Jacqueline Drawing..

204 Monument to General Humphreys.............

500

Pongo Wurmbü......

205 Coals of Fire.....

The Dying Pongo...............................

206 Village of Eyam.....

538

Rev. Dr. Livingston.......

208 Pulpit Rock..

539

The Mission Station at Kuruman..

211 Mrs. Mompesson's Tomb...

540

The Ascent of Vesuvius.....

250 The Riley Gravestones..........

541

Scenes from Country Life-(6 eng.) 252, 346, 402 | Eyam Church..........

541

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502

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IT

is rare, in these latter days of the our political leaders are men of doubtful republic, to find a man of pure moral character ; some of them are notorious for ity in public life. It has come to be almost immorality, and even for profligacy. The a settled maxim that it is impossible to be high places of honor and profit are too often at once a politician and a Christian. The the rewards, not of public service, not of truth must be told ; religious men, gen- virtuous life, not even of intellectual capacierally, refuse to enter the arena of political ty and industry, but of labors for the behoof strife, from fear of its unholy and poison of a political party, or of intrigues for the ous atmosphere. Many, if not most, of benefit of some sordid clique. The Amer

Vol. XI.-1

ican Republic of this day honors the dem- obstacles in the beginning of life. In the agogue oftener than the statesman. West, especially, life is a battle with naYet there is nothing in the proper bus- ture and with circumstances.

The careiness of the politician to prevent the purest ful culture of European civilization would and the best from entering upon its duties. unfit men for this fierce strife. The Taken in its largest sense—the Aristotelian plant, nurtured in the green-house by the Tohitela - politics affords, in theory, the careful tending of the gardener, having its noblest study, next to theology, to which roots constantly watered, and its growth the mind of man can turn itself; and it watched by the eye of anxious expectafurnishes, in practice, one of the grandest tion, may reach an earlier maturity, and and worthiest occupations of human life. gain a more delicate beauty; but the sapTo study the laws of social order, which ling which knows no other tending than are the laws of God, and to apply them in the soil of nature, no other nursing than the government of the state, is a function that of the careless winds, and the free for which the most comprehensive talents showers, and the warm sunshine from and the loftiest virtue are nly too inade heaven, will strike a firmer root, and put quate. It is a sad omen for the state that forth a stronger and more enduring life. these great truths are lost sight of; and By eighteen years of age young M'Lean, that the administration of the government in spite of all difficulties, had gained a of this nation, and of the several states substantial English education, and a tolthat compose it, instead of being in the erable acquaintance with the ancient lanhands of the best men, is too often handed guages. Having determined to prepare over to the worst. On the other hand, himself for the law, he obtained a situation the history of the republic affords bright as writer in the county clerk's office at examples of virtue in high places, in suf- Cincinnati. By working at this clerkship ficient number to vindicate our doctrine part of each day he earned a support, and that the Christian life may be maintained pursued his legal studies in the remaining even by American politicians. Among hours, under the direction of Arthur St. the noblest of these examples is that af- Clair, Esq., an eminent counselor of forded by the life and character of the Cincinnati. subject of this sketch.

In 1807 he was admitted to the bar, and JOHN M'Lean was born in Morris entered upon the practice of the law at County, New Jersey, on the eleventh of Lebanon, Ohio. In the same year he was March, 1785. In 1789 his father determ- | married to Miss Rebecca Edwards, of ined to remove to the Western country, South Carolina, a lady whose excellent and, after short residences in Virginia and qualities both of heart and head secured Kentucky, he finally settled in that part her the esteem of all who knew her, and of the Northwestern Territory now con who guided the affairs of Mr. M'Lean's stituting the State of Ohio.

household with discretion and wisdom for still occupies the farm first taken up by thirty-three years. She died in 1840. Mr his father.

M’Lean's talents and industry soon gained In that new country the means of edu- him a lucrative practice; and had he been cation were limited, nor was Mr. M'Lean, content to remain in private life he would who was rich in children, able to send doubtless have amassed great wealth in them from home to be taught. The young the regular pursuit of his profession. His John aided his father in the duties of the character for integrity was well estabfarm, and to these years of active labor lished, even before his conversion; and he owes, in great part, the stalwart frame although he was inclined, for a few years and robust health which make him now, after entering the bar, to skeptical views at seventy-two, a model of manly vigor in with regard to religion, he maintained an old age. But his mind was too active, unstained reputation in the community. A even in boyhood, to allow him to go un new law, however, was given to his life by cultivated. His was one of those ener the grace of God, under the ministry of the getic natures which are not only prompt to venerable John Collins, whose memory is take opportunities, but to make them. It fragrant throughout the West as one of the is, perhaps, not surprising, that many of most eloquent and faithful of the pioneer the men who have reached the highest preachers of Methodism. The following aceminence in this country have conquered I count of his conversion is from the “Recol

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lections of the Rev. G. W. Walker. Mr. years of great public agitation. The elCollins made an appointment to preach in a ements were gathering, for the storm of private house in Lebanon. At the time war which burst forth in 1812; and the fixed the rooms were crowded, and many great questions of the time penetrated the persons had to stand about the doors. remotest nooks and corners of the counAmong these was young M'Lean, who try. Every man had to take sides upon stood where he could hear distinctly, the issue of “ war with England,” for or though, as he thought, unobserved by the against. Mr. M'Lean identified himself, minister. During the discourse, how in the flush of his youth, with the Demoever, he fell wunder the notice of Mr. cratic party, and was an ardent supporter Collins's keen eye; and his prepossessing of Mr. Madison's war policy. and intelligent appearance attracted, at the In 1812 he was called upon to stand as first glance, the notice of the preacher. the Democratic candidate for the repre

He paused a moment, and offered up a sentation of his district in the Congress of short prayer, mentally, for the immediate the United States, and was elected by a conversion of the young man. After Mr. very large majority. An extra session Collins resumed, the first word he uttered was summoned after the declaration of was “eternity.” That word was spoken war, and Mr. M'Lean then made his first with a voice so solemn and impressive appearance in Congress. Before the sesthat its full import was felt by Mr. sion was over he had made his mark. His M'Lean. All things besides seemed to first motion was for a bill to indemnify indibe nothing in comparison to it. He viduals for property lost or taken for the sought an acquaintance with Mr. Collins, public service during the war, and the bill and a short time after this accompanied afterward became a law. In the next seshim to one of his appointments in the sion he introduced a pension law for the country, and, at the close of the sermon, benefit of the widows and orphans of solhe remained in class to inquire “what he diers falling in the service during the pendmust do to be saved.” On their return ing war. These measures of justice and behome, Mr. Collins told his young friend nevolence were characteristic of the man, that he had a request to make of him, and the vigor with which he pursued them which was reasonable, and he hoped added largely to his reputation; as did a would not be rejected. The request was, speech in defense of the conduct of the that he would read the New Testament war, delivered at the same session. at least fifteen minutes every day till his Young as he was, he served on the two next visit. The promise was made and chief committees of Congress, Foreign strictly performed. At first, the young Affairs and the Public Lands. In 1814 man laid his watch on the table so as to he was re-elected to Congress by a unanbe exact as to the time, but the interest imous vote, a thing then, as now, of rare in the Scriptures increased so that the

In 1815 he was solicited to time of reading was increased dayly. stand for the United States Senatorship After this a covenant was made by the from Ohio, but declined. In 1816 he parties to meet each other at the throne was unanimously elected, by the Legislaof grace at the setting of the sun.

ture of Ohio, to the post of Justice of the not long before Mr. M'Lean was happily Supreme Court of that state. He brought converted to God and united with the to the discharge of the judicial duty the Methodist Episcopal Church.

very highest and aptest qualities, incorFrom that day to this Mr. M'Lean's ruptible integrity, a gentle and patient life and conversation have “ adorned the temper, and large professional attaindoctrine of God our Saviour." His ments. During the six years in which he growth in the Christian graces has ap- held the office his reputation for virtue parently kept pace with his political ad- and talent was not only spread throughvancement. Amid the temptations of out every part of his own state, but very nearly half a century of public life he has widely beyond it. At the end of that never stained his garments ; not one word time he was called into the wider sphere has ever been breathed, even in the stern- of national service, in which, in one ca. est strife of political warfare, against his pacity or another, he has been ever since moral or religious character.

employed. The years from 1807 to 1812 were In 1822 he was appointed Commissioner

occurrence.

It was

of the General Land Office at Washington During the whole of President Adams's by President Monroe; and in 1823 he administration, Judge M'Lean was well was made Postmaster General. There is known to be in favor of General Jackson, no more arduous or thankless post in the for whom, indeed, he had labored in 1824. government service than this; and before | The contest for the presidency in 1828 M'Lean's time the incumbents of the of. was one of great bitterness and violence fice, almost without exception, had failed of feeling ; and then, for the first time, to secure the confidence of the public. was the doctrine openly avowed, that “to On these grounds his friends dissuaded the victors belong the spoils," and that him from accepting it; but, after due con men should be appointed to public office sideration, he decided to undertake the on purely political grounds. Mr. M'Lean work, and, in accordance with the habit had always made the subordinate appointof his life,“ do his best in it.” The re ments in the post-office in view of the casult showed that he had not miscalculated pacity and integrity of the candidates ; his powers for administrative duty. Ev. and, indeed, it was not then even fornierything in the office was out of order; ally a recommendation for such posts that the contracts were, to a large extent, in a man had distinguished himself as a vioinefficient and incompetent hands; the lent partisan; the only qualification which mail service was so irregular that no one now-a-days seems potent in securing place could trust it; in fact, the whole system and power.

On General Jackson's acceswas in a state of disorganization. Judge sion in 1829 he requested Judge M'Lean M'Lean soon changed all this ; incompe- to retain the office which he had filled tent functionaries were discharged; the with so much honor to himself and to the punctual fulfillment of contracts was de government. But it was clear that a new manded and enforced ; the service of the view of political duty was to be the prevmails became, as far as the circumstances alent one, and that he could not longer of the country would allow, regular and retain the independence of character and trustworthy. The Postmaster General action that, from long habit, as well as was himself the soul of the organization ; from his moral constitution, had become and his habits of punctuality, order, and part of his nature. Mr. M'Lean had been, promptitude were soon infused into the and continued to be, a Democrat; but he subordinate functionaries. It is too long had never sacrificed his principles to his ago for the younger men of the present party. Here is the great danger of party generation to remember all this; but the spirit in this country; not in the combinasexagenarians will tell you, to this day, tion of men together, for that is essential that the post-office, under M'Lean's guid- to the accomplishment of great ends in a ance, was, for the times, all that could be free government; but in the despotic use demanded, even by an exacting public of the power which combination gives, to opinion. So strong was M'Lean's posi- control the very members of the party tion that President Adams, on his acces itself, and that, too, in matters beyond the sion in 1825, did not dream of removing proper sphere of party activity. No man him; and, during the four years of that of self-respect and of religious character president's tenure, the Postmaster Gen can submit to such a despotism as this. eral, though of opposite politics, com A true man will not swear obedience to manded his entire confidence and esteem. the words or to the thoughts of any master The strongest possible proof of the repu or of any party; he knows that he is tation of the judge at the time was af- bound, by every obligation of the law of forded by the debates in Congress on a God, by every noble attribute of his own proposition, made in 1827, to increase the moral nature, to exercise for himself the salary of the Postmaster General from high powers of thought, decision, and selffour thousand to six thousand dollars. determination with which God has in. The bill passed both houses almost unan vested him. No man capable of reflecimously ; and in the Senate the eccentric tion at all can, without peril to his own Randolph, of Roanoke, declared " that moral nature, evade the obligation to the salary was intended for the officer, and think for himself; our individual responnot for the office ;" and that he would sibility cannot be shifted upon other men's “ vote for the bill if the salary was limited shoulders upon any plea of ecclesiastical or to M'Lean's tenure."

political necessity whatsoever. We may,

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