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The Doctor, speaking of Milton's Areopagitica, says, “ The danger of “such unbounded liberty (of unlicensed “ printing!, and the danger of bound“ing it, have produced a problem, in .“ the science of government, which hu66. man understanding seems unable to 66 solve."

Let us then have recourse to a divine understanding for the solution of it. Let both the tares and the wheat grow together till the harvest, let while ye gather up the tares, ye root up also the wheat with

them.

· Next follows a curious fee-faw of the arguments pro and con.

* New Narrative, p. 45.

“ If nothing may be published but “ what civil authority have previously “ approved, power must always be the " standard of truth."

Would not one think that problem was thus solved at once?' Is not this an alternative which even Dr. Johnson's predilection for power would hardly admit?

Hold a little, till we have shewn you the evils on the other side.

“ If every dreamer of innovations may “ propagate his projects, there can be no “ settlement; if every murmurer at go6 vernment may diffuse discontent, there “ can be no peace; if every sceptic in “ theology may teach his follies, there “ can be no religion.”

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Is it not better that power should be the standard of truth, than that we should have no settlement, no peace, no religion ? gion? : "1.

But, says another writer, as honest a man, and at least as fair a reasoner, as Dr. Johnson, “ If men were not to de“ clare their opinions in spight of estab“ lishments either in church or state, “ truth would soon be banished the “ carth * ;' and to this agrees John Milton. What is then to be done?

Why, says a moderator, punish the authors of these wicked publications ; for Dr. Johnson tells you; “It is yet al“ lowed that every society may punish, “ though not prevent, the publication of * Dedication of the Ejay on Spirit.

“ opinions

..“ If nothing may be published but So what civil authority have previously • approved, power must always be the " standard of truth.”

Would not one think that problem was thus folved at once?' Is not this an alternative which even Dr. Johnson's predilection for power would hardly admit?

Hold a little, till we have shewn you the evils on the other side.

“ If every dreamer of innovations may “ propagate his projects, there can be no “ settlement; if every murmurer at go“ vernment may diffuse discontent, there “ can be no peace; if every sceptic in . “theology may teach his follies, there ,' “ can be no religion.”

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gion?

Is it not better that power fhould be the standard of truth, than that we should have no settlement, no peace, no religion ?

.. ". . . But, says another writer, as honest a man, and at least as fair a reasoner, as Dr. Johnson, “ If men were not to de“ clare their opinions in spight of estab“ lishments either in church or state, “ truth would soon be banished the “ carth * ; " and to this agrees John Milton. What is then to be done?

Why, says a moderator, punish the authors of these wicked publications ; for Dr. Johnson tells you, “It is yet al“ lowed that every society may punish, “though not prevent, the publication of * Dedication of the Essay on Spirit.

6 opinions

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