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Continental Life Insurance Company

OY

NEW YORK,
Ofice, Nos. 22, 24 and 26 NASSAU STREET.

OFFICERS.
Policies issued in 1869,

President, 8,778.

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JUSTUS LAWRENCE

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Vice-President,

M. B. WYNKOOP.

Assets, Dec. 31, 1869.

83,500,000

Secretary,

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J. P. ROGERS,

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Actuary,

Total Policies issued,

S. C. CHANDLER, JR.

Over 21,000.

Medical Examiner,

E. HERRICK, M. D.

ÆTNA INSURANCE CO.,

INCORPORATED 1819. CHARTER PERPETUAL.

CASH CAPITAL, $3,000,000. Losses Paid in 50 Years, $26,000,000 ASSETS, JANUARY 1, 1870,

(At Market Value) Cash in hand and in Bank..

$682,582 08 Real Estate..

253,319 14 Mortgage Bonde...

967,125 00 Bank Stock.

1,426,445 00 United States, State, and City Stock, and other Public Securities 2,220,033 75 Total...

$5,549,504 97

LIABILITIES.
Claims not due, and unadjusted..

$256,068 89

L. J. HENDEE, President. WM. B. CLARK, Aso't Sec'y.

J. GOODNOW, See'y.

J. C. HILLIARD, SPECIAL AGENTE.
E. J. BASSETT, GRXERAL AGENT.

H. L. PASCO,

NO, IX.

June, 1862.
I. The Chinese Language and Literature. VII. Sir Phillip Sidney.
II. Angelology and Demonology, Ancient VIII. Aurora Leigh.
and Modern.

IX. Yellow Fever a Worse Enemy to Civil III. Sir Thomas More and His Tmes.

ization than to Soldiers. IV. Maud as a Representative Poem.

X. The National Academy of Design and V. The Comedies of Moliere.

its Great Men. VI. Education and Unity of Pursuit of the XI. Notices and Criticisms.

Christian Ministry.

NO. X.

September, 1862. I. Lucretius on the Nature of Things.

VII. New Theories and New Discoveries in 11. The Works and Influence of Goethe.

Natural History: Ill. Madame de Maintenon and her Times. VIII. Poland-Causes and Consequences of Her JV. Effects of War and Speculation on Cur

Fall. rency.

IX, Quackery of Insurance Companies. V. Sacred Poetry of the Middle Ages.

X, Notices and Criticisins. TI. The laws and Ethics of War.

NO. XI.

December, 1862
I, The Arts and Sciences among the Ancient VT. Andre and Arnold,
Egyptiaus.

VII. Bacon as an Essayist. 11. New England Individualism,

VIII. Publishers : Good, Bad, and Indifferent. III. Genius, Talent and Tact.

IX. Direct and Indirect Taxation at Home and IV. Ought our Great Atlantic Cities be Forti

Abroad. fied.

X. Netices and Criticisms. V. Tho Writings and Loves of Robert Burns.

NO. XIT.

March, 1863. 1. The Works and Influence of Schiller.

VI. Orators and Eloquence. II. Astronomical Theories.

VII. Insurance Quackery and its Organs. III. Culture of the Human Voice.

VIII, Charlemagne and His Times. IV. Lucien and His Times.

IX. James Sheridan knowles. V. Electro-Haguetism and Kindred Sciences. X. Notices and Criticisms,

No. XUT.

June, 1863. J. The Greek Tragic Drama- Æschylus.

VI. Manhattan College. 17. Theology of the American Indians.

VII. Woman--Her luftuence and Capabilities. J. Phonographic Short-Hand.

VIII. Peruvian Antiquit es. JV. Arabic language and Literature.

IX. Manufacture and Use or artificial Precious V. Eirthquakes - their Causes and Conse.

Stones. quences.

X. Notices and Criticisms.

XO, XIV.

September, 1863. 1. The Insane and their Treatment, Past and VII. The Public Schools of New York. Present.

VIII, Ancient Scandinavia and its Inhabitants. II. The Clubs of London.

IX. Social Condition of Working Classes in MI, Cowper aud His Writings.

England. JV. Feudalism and Chivalry.

X. Commencement of Colleges, Seminaries, V. Meteors.

etc. VI, Spuriousness and Charlatanism of Phre- XI. Netices and Criticisms.

nology.

NO. XV.

December, 1863. I. Prison Discipline, Past and Present,

VII. The House of Ilapsburg. II. Richard Brinsley Sheridan,

VIII. The Mexicans and their Revolutions, from II. Intluence of the Medici.

Iturbide to Maximilian. WV. Girard College and its Founder.

IX. The Gypsies, their History and Charactor. V. M dern Civilization,

X. Notices and Criticisms. W. Laplace and His Discoveries.

(See page 28.)

COLLEGE

OF THE

Christian Brothers,

ST. LOUIS, MO., 1868.

This Literary Institution possesses all the advantages of an agreeable and healthy location, easy of access, beinz situated on a rizing ground, a little southwest of the Pacific Railroad ter: minus in the city of St. Louis, Missouri. It was founded in 1851, by the Brothers of the Chris. tian Schools, incorporated in 1855 by the Sute Legislature, and empowered to confer degrees ant academical honors. However favorable the auspices under which it commenced its literary career, its progress since has surpassed all anticipation. Growing equally in public contidence and in tho number of students, it has gone on extending its reputation. Repeated additions have been mado to the original buildings. The number of students received within the last year amounted to more than 600, and many applicants were refused admission for want of room.

Every possible attention is paid to whatever can contribute to the health and happiness of its inmates-ventilation, cleanlin2ss, spacious halls, dormitories, refectory, recreation halls for cold or damp weather, etc., etc.

The various arts and sciences usually taught in colleges find here an appropriate place in a system of education established by experience, conducted on the most approved plan, and with a devotedness commensurate with the greatness of the work engaged in. By reason of the great number of classes, a thorough gradation for all capacities and acquirements has been attained, and the frequent examinations and promotions begei emulation, the soul of advancement, making labor a pleasure, and success certainty.

The course of instruction pursued in the Academy is divided into three departments: the primary, the intermediate, and the collegiate. There is beside, an exclusively commercial course, offering rare advantages to young gentlemen who intend to make business their profession. It is divided into three classes, in which the chief place is given to instruction in Book-keeping, Arithmetic, Gergraphy, and History, Business Forms and Correspondence, Epistolary Composition, Penmanship, ete, with Lectures on Commercial Law, Political Economy, etc. Diplomas can be obtained in the Commercial Department by such as merit that distinction.

The session commences on the last Monday in August, and ends about the 31 of July, with an annual public examination and distribution of premiums, and the conferring of degrees and academical honors.

On the completion of the course the degree of A. B. is conferred upon such students as, on ex. amination are found worthy of that distinction. The degree of A. M. can be obtained by graduates of the first degree after two years devoted to some scieutific or literary pursuit, their moral character remaining unexceptionable.

The government is a union of mildness and firmness, energy, and kindness, a blonding of paternal solicitude with fraternal sympathy; the results of which are contentment, good order and happiness. The morals and general deportment of the students are constantly watched over; Brothers preside at their recreations,and their comfort and personal habits receive every attention,

TERMS.

Entrance Fee..
Board and Tuition, per sessiou.
Washing.
Physician's Feo..
For Half Boarders.
For Day Scholars..
In the Senior Class.
Vacation at the Institutiou.

$8 00 250 00 20 00

8 09 100 00 1000 40 00 40 00

Music, Drawing, and the use of apparatus in the study of Chemistry and Natural Philosophy form extra charges.

N. B.-Payments semi-annually and invariably in advance.

No deduction for absence, except in case of protracted illness or dismissal.

* No extra charges for the study of the German, French, and Spanish languages.

NO. XVI.

March, 1864. J. Sources and Characteristics of Hindoo VI. Our Quack Doctors and their PerformCivilization,

ances. II. Juvenal on the Decadence of Rome.

VII. Kepler and His Discoveries. III. The Brazilian Empire.

VIII. Ancient and Modern Belief in a Future IV, Catiline and His Conspiracy.

Life. V. Klopstock as a Lyric and Epic Poet.

IX. Notices and Criticisms,

NO. XVII.

June, 1864.

1. Pythagoras and His Philosophy.
II. History and Resources of Maryland.
JII. Russian Literature, Past and Present.
IV. Cemeteries and Modes of Burial, Ancient

and Modern.
V. College of the Holy Cross.

VI. Liebnitz as a Philosopher and Discoverer.
VII. The Negro and the White Man in Africa.
VIII. Our Presidents and Governors compared

to Kings and Petty Princes.
IX. Notices and Criticisms.

NO. XVIII.

September, 1864. 1. Chemistry, its History, Progress, and VI. Spinoza and His Philosophy. Utility.

VII. Commencements of Colleges, UniverII. Vico's Philosophy of History.

sities, &c. III. Elizabeth and Her Courtiers.

VIII. Emigration as Influenced by the War. IV. Do the Lower Animals Reason?

IX. Notices and Criticisms. V. William Pitt and His Times.

NO. XIX.

December, 1864. I. Pericles and His Times.

VI. Leo X. and His Times. II. The Civilizing Forces.

VII. Chemical Analysis by Spectral ObserIII. Chief-Justice Taney.

vations. IV. Spanish Literature-Lope de Vega. VIII. The President's Message. V. Currency--Causes of Depreciation.

IX. Notices and Criticisms.

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September, 1865. I. Lord Derby's Translation of Homer. VI. The National Debt of the United II. William Von Humboldt as & Compara

States.

[[siang. tive Philologist.

VII. The Civilization of the Ancient PerIII. The Wits of the Reign of Queen Anne. VIII. Commencements of Colleges and IV. American Female Criminals,

Seminaries, V. The Negative Character of Cicero.

IX. Notices and Criticisms.

(See page 30.]

THE

NEW YORK HOTEL,

BROADWAY,

(OCCUPYING THE WHOLE BLOCK,)

Between Washington Place and Waverly Place,

NEW YORK.

AMID all the modifications which the public taste has undergone, aud all the material improvements that have been made during the last ten years, this favorite House has continued to maintain its reputation, as occupying the bighest rank among American Hotels.

Its situation combines many advautages both for strangers visiting the city, and for citizens occupied in business, and wishing to avoid the annoy. ances of housekeeping.

The Astor and Mercantile Libraries, and the Cooper Institute, are in the immediate vicinity of the Hotel; on the other side, the University of New York, Washington Parade Ground, and the Fifth Avenue are equally convenient.

The table is always supplied with every luxury which one of the richess markets in the world can afford. In short, no pains nor expense are spared by the undersigned to contribute to the comfort of their guests, and at the same time make them feel perfectly at home, without the apprehension that they will be required to conform to any needless "regulations."

That these various advantages are appreciated by our patrons is sufficiently proved by the fact that there are several families now at the New York Hotel, who have boarded at it for periods varying from seven to fifteen years.

Although few first-class hotels in the world enjoy a larger patronage than the New York, the proprietors always manage to reserve a few superior suites of rooms for families or individuals requiring special accommodations; otherwise it would be useless to make any announcement like the present.

D. M. HILDRETH & CO.,

Proprietors.

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