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Q. 10.

What distinction is there in the two tables of this law?

A. The former contains the four first commandments, which comprise our duty to God;—the latter · contains the six last commandments, which include our duty to ourselves, and to our fellow creatures.

Q. 11. What is the summary of these ten commandments

A. Supreme love to God, and love to mankind as to ourselves. This seems to be an exposition of the whole moral law, which is fulfilled in pure, disinterested benevolence.(h)

Q. 12. Did God give to our - first Parents any test of their obedience, in addition to the moral law? A. He did. He gave them a positive precept or

. law,* prohibiting them to eat of the fruit of the tree of knowledge of good and evil, which stood in the midst of the garden of Eden.(1)

Q. 13. Was abstinence from partaking of the forbidden fruit a condition, on which was suspended their everlasting happiness?

*

IX. Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbour.

X. Thou shalt not covet thy neighbour's house, thou shalt not covet thy neighbour's wife, nor his man-servant, nor his maid-servant, nor his ox, nor his ass, nor any thing that is thy neighbour's.

(h) Matt. 22. 37-40. Jesus said unto him thou shalt love the Lord thy God, with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind. This is the first and great commandment. And the second is like unto it, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets.

(i) Gen. 2. 16, 17. And the Lord God commanded the man, saying, Of every tree of the garden thou mayest freely eat. But of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt mot eat of it.

* The distinction between moral and positive laws and duties seems to be this, viz. moral laws or duties are founded in the nature or relation of beings, discoverable by the light of nature; positive laws or duties are tounded in the relation of beings, discoverable by Divine revelation only. As good a reason, no doubt, exists in the Divine mind for the one as the other.

A. It was.

God instituted this prohibition as a test of their conduct upon which was suspended their eternal future state.(j)

() Gen. 2. 17. But of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not eat of it; for in the day, that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die. Rom. 6. 23. For the wages of sin is death.

CHAPTER IX.

Creation and Primitive State of man.

A.

Q. 1. When did God create man?

À. At the close, or on the latter part, of the sixth day from the commencement of the creation of the world. He was the last of God's created works.(a)

Q. 2. In what state did God create mankind?

A. He created them male and female, and in His own image, that is, intelligent and holy, and thus resembling, in a degree, their Creator in his natural and moral perfections;—He created them in the state of manhood, in full vigour of body and mind, in perfect felicity, and but little inferiour, in nature, or order, to the angels, and made them capable of perpetual progression in knowledge, holiness, and happiness.(b)

Q. 3.' Is man a simple, or a compound being?

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(a) See the first chapter of Genesis.

(b) Gen. 1. 27. So God created man in his own image; in the image of God created he him; male and female created he them. Eccl. 7.29. Lo, this only have I found, that God hath made man upright; but they have sought out many inventions. Eph. 4. 24. And that ye put on the new man which after God is created in righteousness and true holi

Gen. 1. 28. and God blessed them, and God said unto them, Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth, and subdue it; and have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over every living thing, that moveth upon the earth. Ps. 8. 5. For thou hast made him a little lower than the angels, and hast crowned him with glory and honour.

ness.

A. He is a compound being, made up of body and soul. He possesses a completely organized body, formed of the dust of the earth with the senses of feeling, tasting, smelling, hearing, and seeing; and a rational soul, a pure, uncompounded, spiritual, created substance or essence, having understanding, affections, and will.(0)

Q. 4. What is the duration of man's existence?

A. His body is mortal, and is of short continuance; but his soul is immortal, endless in its existence.(a)

Q. 5. What relation does man sustain to this lower world?

A. He sustains the relation of its constituted head and lord. (C)

Q. 6. Where were the first human Pair placed at their creation?

A. They were placed in the garden of Eden, or the earthly paradise, in the enjoyment of every terrestrial good, that heart could wish.(R)

(c) Gen. 2.7. And the Lord God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul. Eccl. 12.7. Then shall the dust return to the earth as it was; and the spirit shall return unto God who gave it.

(a) Ps. 90. 10. The days of our years are three score years and ten; and if by reason of strength they be four score years, yet is their strength labour and sorrow; for it is soon cut off, and we fly away. Matt. 10. 28. And fear not them which kill the body, but are not able to kill the soul; but rather fear him which is able to destroy both soul and body in hell.

(e) Gen. 1. 28. And God blessed them, and God said unto them, Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth and subdue it; and have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over every living thing that moveth upon the earth. Ps. 8. 6. Thou madest him to have dominion over the works of thy hands; thou hast put all things under his feet.

(f) Gen. 2. 8, 9. And the Lord God planted a garden eastward in Eden, and there he put the man whom had formed. And out of the ground made the Lord God to grow every tree, that is pleasant to the sight, and good for food; the tree of life also in the midst of the garden, and the tree of knowledge of good and evil.

Q. 7. In what did the chief happiness of man consist in his primitive state?

A. In knowing, loving, serving, and enjoying God his Creator, Preserver, and Benefactor.

Q. 8. Were our first Parents put upon probation, as it respects their moral conduct; immediately after their creation?

A. They were. As soon as life commenced, their moral trial commenced.(5)

Q. 9. In what relation did Adam our first Pro- , genitor stand to his posterity?

A. He stood in relation to them, not only as their natural head, (they descending from him by ordinary generation, but also as their federal or representative head, as it respects their moral state. He was to be, in both senses, the head of millions and millions of immortal beings.(5)

(g). Gen. 2. 15–17. And the Lord God took the man, and put him into the garden of Eden, to dress it and keep it. And the Lord God commanded the man saying, Of every tree of the garden thou mayest freely eat; but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not eat of it; for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die.

(h) Rom. 5. 18, 19. Therefore as by the offence of one, judgment came upon all men to condemnation; even so by the righteousness of one the free gift came upon all men unto justification of life. For as by one man's disobedience many were made sinners; so by the obedience of one, shall many be made righteous.

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