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eavor to make comotive power, by means of camere
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TIQUITIES.-A NEW MOTWE POWER.
use the home done by Mr. Milz; and be sees the really di
public loans the thing as thoroughly, perhaps

, takip war, and the sible to be seen, -as when he expres the mself refers to | nonsense about " the impossibility d' a petere

markets pos- al glut:" but he is not suficiently lisiant in great activity impressing it; and we think, as we bare il

. RICARDO's already, that he would use hypothes fire also handled, to much and actuality too little the expedie

where profits of principles. re in the wages! The literary merit of this book cuak i industry : but its lucid arrangement and its perfect cleans

unlikely as to for though non-economical readers may en seems a barren times be unable to follow the author, bar mmodity could arises from the abstrusenes of the sepse uluy for imple- or from their own deficiency, not lis he revious expense scientific value of the essays follows ira ti t wages remain very abstruseness: they are engage in de

is coro. Strict-cussing essential truths, which, once calid ight be held aed, can be clearly enough presented

, betrie stry.

establishment is a work of exceeding til di Definition and complexity, just as pure gold is pants " is devoted to lible

, though it cannot be detected by the position, of the gar, in the ore or the process ol reinig i pothesis. Upon perhaps the most striking quality of dem n inclination to is the love of truth, for its own sale

, dhe

greater part of by the author. This truth may mes? be necessary in think, be always attained; but it is also ubt whether po- pursued withoni fear or favor

, and that i an abstract sci- perhaps harder, without deference in e, politics, war, authority or learning towards prepara els with animal opinion. ions. It is true ometry are hycan produce a he geometrical of an eminence called Rolling Hill, pot fi

British ANTIQUITIES --A barrow on det 3 misrepresents | Bakewell, Derbyshire

, was opened a love two pursuits is since, and two rade unbaked urns female t. Geometry taining ashes and fragments of bunul aly with exten- The account adds: One of the arts was ditan lature which it entire, but the other unfortunately full by 1 geography too on being removed. On proceeding irda le same, on to the tumulus, three human skeleton tel any thing save covered, deposited in separate cels are ices. A similar formed of oblong stones

. Doe of the villa surveying; and was of great dimensions

, evidently the run are considered, of this skeleton was inusual, it having begin at for the ag in the cell or coffin in a siting pasture. the character, of metal resembling silver, and a uldier, are not a deer, were also found in or neer the elite liers happens to ancient barrows, many of which are me These sciences -Lit. Gaz. their nature is 88, or it may be

hat state of ex- motive was charged upon the low power ou in this hypo- tem, because there was not a suferita por vore thoroughly compress the air to a greater extent, the hase possible orment perfectly succeeded. In essentielle re clearly with three atmospheres, the locomotive nas rception, and to T'his , indeed, is

next month. --Atheneum.

In came a gallant cavalier,
“Good day, fair maid," he cried :
“Good day to thee, my goldsmith dear,
Make me a costly diadem
To deck my lovely bride."
And when the diadem complete
Its blaze of richness Aung,
Then mournfully Helena sweet
Upon her arm, when all alone,
The glittering circlet hung.

« How wondrous blest the bride will be
Who binds this on her brow!
Ah! had that cavalier sent me
A simple wreath of roses,
How happy were I now!"

Ere long in came the cavalier,
The garland view'd, and cried,
“ Now make to me, thou goldsmith dear,
A little ring of diamonds
To deck my lovely bride."
And when the ring was all complete,
With precious diamonds graced,
Then mournfully Helena sweet
Upon her finger, when alone,
The sparkling hoop half placed.

“ How wondrous blest the bride will be
Oo whom this ring shall glow :
Ah ! had that cavalier on me
One lock of his dark hair bestow'd,
How bappy were I now.

Ere long in came the cavalier,
Survey'd the ring, and cried,
“ Thou hast for me, thou goldsmith dear,
Wrought all these gifts right skilfully
To deck my lovely bride.

“ Yet that I may their fitness test,
Draw nigh, fair maid, to me ;
On thy form be the proof express'd
Of my love's bridal ornaments-
She is as bright as thee."
'Twas on a Sunday morning fair,
And thus the beauteous maid
Was tastefully with skill and care,
That she might to the church proceed,
In her best robes array'd.
With modest glowing blushes graced
Did she before him stand;
On her the golden wreath he placed,
On her the ring of diamonds,
Then took her by the hand a

“ Helena sweet! Helena dear!
The jest aside I fling-
In thee does that rare bride appear,
For whom I sought the diadem,
For whom I sought the ring.
Where gold, and pearls, and jewels shine,
Thy childhood here bas fled-
Be that to thee prophetic sign,
That thou to loftiest honors

Must now by me be led."
Llangollen.

Janet W. WILKINSON.

I give them a new and more glorious birth

In regions of pure and perennial bliss." “Let me bless thee,” I cried, “ for thy missions

of love; Oh! say to what name shall I fashion my

breath?" “The Angel or Life, is my title above, But short-sighted mortals' have christen'd me

DEATH!"

THE GRAVES OF GENIUS.

From the Literary Gazette.
WHERE sleep the dead, whose living tones fill’d

earth with dreams of heaven-
Where to their loved and precious dust has dust

at last been givenWhere do they rest whose honor'd names breath'd

ever of renown, They of the burning heart and mind, they of the

laurel crown? Some lie beneath the sculptured tombs, beneath

the holy shade Of England's old cathedral-walls, wherein our

fathers pray'd, And marble statues stand around, and o'er them

banders wave, And chisellid flowers in beauty bend above each

ballow'd grave.

And some lie on a foreign shore, far from their

childhood's home, And only by their place of rest the stranger's step

may roamn, And only the dark cypress-tree is left to mark the

spot Where one may sleep whose blessed tones can

never be forgot. And many lie beneath the sod, the village-church

around, Without a stone to tell us where their

green

beds may be found; Neglected and alone they seem, and yet it is not

80, Though seldom to their quiet graves earth's wan

derers may go.

Where sleeps the dust of those whose thoughts

are not by death laid low? Where are the tombs of genius seen ?-what mat

ters it to know, Think rather of the place of rest the mighty dead

must find, And shrines that never may decay, in every

thoughtful mind.

THE GOLDSMITH'S DAUGHTER.

FROM THE GERMAN OF UHLAND.

From the Literary Gazette.
A GOLDSMITH stood within his stall
'Mid pearls and jewels fine;
“ The rarest treasure of them all
I prize in thee, Helena,
Beloved daughter mine!”

[graphic]

POETRY.

De vous birth

In came a gallant cavalier

, I bliss."

"Good day, fair maid," he cried

"Good day to thee, my goldsmith dear, For thy missions Make me a costly dindem

To deck my lovely bride."
I fashion my

And when the diadem complete above,

Its blaze of richness fong
e christend me Then mournfully Helena sweet

Upon her arm, when all alone,
The glittering circlet hung.

How wondrous blest the bride will be
ENIUS.

Who binds this on her brow!
Ah! had that cavalier sent me
A simple wreath of roses,

How happy were I now!"
ving tones fill'd
en-
Ere long in came the cavalier

,
as dust has dust
The garland view'd, and cried

,
"Now make to me, thou goldsmid det

, A little ring of diamonds

names breath'd Tod, they of the

To deck my lovely bride."

And when the ring was all complet, tombs, beneath

With precious diamonds graced,

Then mournfully Helena sweet s, wherein our

Upon her finger, when alone,

The sparkling hoop half placed , and o'er them

“How wondrous blest the bride wille
end above each

On whom this ring shall glow:
Ah! bad that cavalier on me
One lock of his dark hair bestow'l

,
far from their How happy were I now."
stranger's step
Ere long in came the cavalier

,
Survey'd the ring, and cried,
left to mark the

Thou hast for me, thon goldsmih da,

Wrought all these gifts right skilul
ssed tones can

To deck my lovely bride.
Yet that I may their fitness test

,
village-church Draw nigh, fair maid, to me;

On thy form be the proof express heir green beds

Of my love's bridal ornaments

She is as bright as thee."
und yet it is not
'Twas on a Sunday morning fair

,
res earth's was-

And thus the beauteous maid

Was tastefully with skill und care, whose thoughts

That she might to the church prel

In her best robes array'd. n?-what mat

With modest glowing blushes graced

Did she before him stand;
the mighty dead

On her the golden wreath he place
On her the ring of diamonds,
Then took her by the hand:
"Helena sweet! Helena dear!
The jest aside I fling

In thee does that rare bride appear
UGHTER

For whom I sought the diades,
For whom I sought the ring

cay, in every

stall

all

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She knows that the work now ertalled alibi

Would have gladden'd, percharne malbork all honors shed. Time's calm healing influence soies her pak

Oft speaks of his name whom shevalielo
changeful year, And loves on his cherished ethesians to del;

Yet ever, while viewing these records with mode
She mournfully turns from one polme asik-

It wakes the sad thoughts in her husza thu list minster Abbey, his Tis her loved one's last effort is for POETRY.

Det
RAL:

Seven lustres bad be been my friend.

Be that my plea when I suspend
This all-unworthy wreath on such a pet hier

,
agazine
reat,
blind,

THE POSTHUMOUS WORK
and state
mind,

BY MES. ABDT
as was starr'd,

From the Metropolitas imzelf was sign'd.

The work has come forth—and sig, pain,
mrevered,

dunce,
al fame. All eagerly strive to peruse it at one;

O'er long lists of names the libraria siga
tell their name. And plottings and strivings in book-eluk tek;
-known, All mourn for the writer ent of in his peas

All vow he surpassed every wit of his titre eatness shall pro- Nay, doubt whether Sheridan

, Geldauit, ut like
Could

, united, have equalled his Posthave it
loom;
around,
nge,
flight,

that knows no
thood,
stood,
band,

WORK!
Hell. Campbell

rear'd

mbell want? At eve, the blue coterie pour forth their pres -
renown.

* What talent, what judgment the story distin'

"Such volumes the archives of England end band him down ?" Surely Westminster Abbey should en ben bust

niche;" ;

"Did you read his first work I a Va, al bei the laurel crown.

the young ray,

Of the morning that promised a glorise dy;
ne-proof,

He has fairly, since then, by himselben se
And of all his productions

, the best is the lus"
rted roof,
Campbell's tomb, Not far from the scene, in a dimly-lit race,

Uncherished, unheeded, apart in her glom.

Behold yon pale widow-she droops herselle
lame-wreath still And weeps for the gifted one silent and end

Small intercourse now with the world can des
Yet she hears in her chamber the echo of For
Giving honor to him most lamented, mis leer

Oh! why is the melody harsh to her ear!
ger eyes,
d,

She thinks on the hours when exhausted, op
brave,

He toiled through the season allotted firs grave,

And wrote with that mixture of hope and dis reedom-shrieking Only known by the sad ones who are inte

bread:

The world to the spell of his genius was a strew'd

It was sparing of praise, and more sporting strange!

Long slights he endured, long unkindnes be

Till the suffering spirit could brook then be out

s tenr.

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