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S. HRg. 101-673 SUPERCONDUCTING SUPER COLLIDER PROGRAM

AND THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'S BUDGET
FOR FUNDAMENTAL SCIENCE

HEARING

BEFORE THE

SUBCOMMITTEE ON
ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

OF THE

COMMITTEE ON
ENERGY AND NATURAL RESOURCES

UNITED STATES SENATE
ONE HUNDRED FIRST CONGRESS

SECOND SESSION

ON THE

SUPERCONDUCTING SUPER COLLIDER PROGRAM AND THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'S BUDGET FOR FUNDAMENTAL SCIENCE

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Printed for the use of the

iviu Committee on Energy and Natural Resources

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

WASHINGTON : 1990

29-832

t (Star print) For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, Congressional Sales Office

U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402

COMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND NATURAL RESOURCES

J. BENNETT JOHNSTON, Louisiana, Chairman DALE BUMPERS, Arkansas

JAMES A. MCCLURE, Idaho WENDELL H. FORD, Kentucky

MARK O. HATFIELD, Oregon HOWARD M. METZENBAUM, Ohio

PETE V. DOMENICI, New Mexico BILL BRADLEY, New Jersey

MALCOLM WALLOP, Wyoming JEFF BINGAMAN, New Mexico

FRANK H. MURKOWSKI, Alaska TIMOTHY E. WIRTH, Colorado

DON NICKLES, Oklahoma KENT CONRAD, North Dakota

CONRAD BURNS, Montana
HOWELL T. HEFLIN, Alabama

JAKE GARN, Utah
JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER IV, West Virginia MITCH MCCONNELL, Kentucky

DARYL OWEN, Staff Director

D. MICHAEL HARVEY, Chief Counsel
FRANK M. CUSHING, Staff Director for the Minority
GARY G. ELLSWORTH, Chief Counsel for the Minority

SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

WENDELL H. FORD, Kentucky, Chairman

JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER IV, West Virginia, Vice Chairman DALE BUMPERS, Arkansas

PETE V. DOMENICI, New Mexico HOWARD M. METZENBAUM, Ohio

MITCH MCCONNELL, Kentucky TIMOTHY E. WIRTH, Colorado

DON NICKLES, Oklahoma HOWELL T. HEFLIN, Alabama

CONRAD BURNS, Montana

JAKE GARN, Utah
J. BENNETT JOHNSTON and JAMES A. McCLURE are Ex Offico Members of the Subcommittee

BENJAMIN S. COOPER, Senior Professional Staff Member, Majority
RICHARD D. GRUNDY, Senior Professional Staff Member, Minority

(II)

SUPERCONDUCTING SUPER COLLIDER PROGRAM AND THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'S BUDGET FOR FUNDAMENTAL SCIENCE

TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 1990

U.S. SENATE, SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT, COMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND NATURAL RESOURCES,

Washington, DC. The subcommittee met, pursuant to notice, at 10:04 a.m., in room SD-366, Dirksen Senate Office Building, Hon. Wendell H. Ford, presiding OPENING STATEMENT OF HON. WENDELL H. FORD, U.S. SENATOR

FROM KENTUCKY Senator FORD. Good morning, ladies and gentlemen. Today's hearing on the Superconducting Super Collider and the DOE science budget has become an annual event for the subcommittee. This is a very important part of the Department of Energy's budget.

In these programs the Department is fortifying foundations, foundations for the Nation's scientific and technological expertise and our international competitiveness. The fiscal year of 1991 requests for these programs is $2.3 billion, an increase of 13.6 percent over fiscal year 1990 appropriations.

We are talking about physics, chemistry, material science, mathematics, engineering, geoscience, biological and environmental science, and the major facilities where American science is practiced. DOE's proposed budget provides for broad-based support for science. It provides for growth. It also makes substantial commitments that will require Congress to vote much larger increases in the future.

The largest such commitment is a Superconducting Super Collider project that is getting underway in Texas. The fiscal year 1991 budget request for the SSC is $318 million, an increase of $100 million over last year's appropriations.

When we get into construction on the project, the annual appropriation needed for the SSC alone will be almost $1 billion. It is no secret that some of us are pretty nervous about this project. We are nervous about the commitment of resources involved. It has not made us any less nervous to learn that the total estimated cost of the SSC may increase by as much as $2 billion above the original estimate of $5.9 billion.

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