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NEAR FRANKFORT, KY. THE THIRTY-FIFTH Session of this well known establishment will open on 1st day of January, 1849. That the advantages it offers may be more extensiv enjoyed, FORTY young ladies will be adınitted, instead of the limited number he tofore received; and, that every necessary attention may be bestowed upon the · JAMES S. Fall, A. M., a graduate of Bethany College, and for two years pa Professor of Ancient Languages in Franklin College, Tennessee, will be, here ter, associated with myself in the instruction and direction of the school. Fifte of the young ladies will board in the family of Mr. James Fall, whose reside adjoins my own. Here they will be surrounded by every necessary comfort, a will enjoy, at the same time, all the benefits of the school.

The Greek, Latin, French, and German Languages, as well as an enlarg Mathematical course, when desired, will be critically and thoroughly taug] without extra charge. The superb suit of apparatus, imported from London ai Paris at an expense of about $9000 dollars, affords means for illustrating, in tl fullest and most interesting manner, all the departments of physical science which instruction is given.

Terms, as for many years; and, with full particulars, made known on applic tion to

P. S. FALL,

Frankfort, Kentucky.
FOUR THOUSAND COPIES!
Published in about as many months

of
BENEDICT'S HISTORY OF THE BAPTISTS.
• A few more competent agents may find profitable employment in circulatin
this work in fields not yet appropriated, particularly in the Western and Souther
States. Apply to the publishers. With the above work may be circulated by
agents, the BAPTIST LIBRARY, three volumes in one, royal octavo, boun
in a style uniform with the History, consisting of more than 1300 pages.

The Library has been before the public sufficiently long to be known as con taining a large amount of valuable reading, and a number of excellent disting works no where else to be found. If what it contains were published in separate books, twenty dollars would not purchase them. Prices.-History, in sheep binding,

$3 50 in cloth,

$3. Library,

3 50 The set,

6 50 A liberal discount is made to agents purchasing for cash.

The publishers append a few of the notices which the History has received from the religious press.

From Rev. Wm. R. Williams, D. D.-The new edition of Benedict's History seems to the subscriber a book of much value. He has made large extracts from the history of the Mennonite Martyr. From the great scarcity of the work which furnishes these, the extracts will, to our churches have, besides their own intrinsie interest, the additional charm of novelty. As to the Baptists of the U. States he has, with laborious fidelity, compiled a mass of historical and statistical intely gence no where else to be found, and which would, in the judgment of the sun scriber, make his volume almost indispensable to every one of our pastors, and abundantly deserving of the patronage and study of our churches.

Recommended also by Edward B. Underhill, Esq., Cor. Sec. of the Hansend, Knollys Society, England, and by the principal religious journals of this country

LEWIS COLBY, Publisher.

122 Nassau street, N. Y.
GENERAL AGENTS.
W. F. M. Arny, General Agent for Bethany College and Millennial Harbin-1
ger, is now in Indiana. We hope our agents and subscribers will be ready to
settle with him.

D. W. Shurtleff, General Agent for Arkansas, Mississippi, and Louisiana.
NEW AGENT-C. R. Estill, Richmond, Madison county, Ky.

F Address all communications for brother Robert Graham, to Fayetteville
Washington co. Ark. He has a good supply of our publications on hand.

All communications for Elder D. P. Henderson, to Columbia, Mo.

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THE LARGEST, BEST, AND CHEAPEST

DICTIONARY,
of the English language, is, confessedly,

WEBSTER'S; The entire work, unabridged, in one vol. crown quarto, 1452 pages, with portrait of the author, revised by Professor Goodrich, of Yale College. Price $6.

"The most complete, accurate, and reliable Dictionary of the language,is the recent testimony given to this work by many Presidents of Colleges and other distinguished literary men throyghout the country.

Containiug three times the amount of matter of any other English Dictionary compiled in this country, of any abridgment of this work, yet

"Its definitiops are models of condensation and purity. The most complete work of the kind that any nation can boast of' '--Hon. Wm. B. Calhoun.

“We rejoice that it bids fair to become the standard Dictionary to be used by the numerous millions of people who are to inhabit the United States.”—Signeil by 104 members of Congress. Published by G. &C. MERRIAM, Springfield, Mass., and for sale by

LEWIS COLBY No. 122, Nassau street, N. Y, at publisher's prices.

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FEMALE SEMINARY. THE regular spring and summer session of the BLACK ROCK FEMALE SEMINARY will commence on the first Wednesday in May next, and continue twenty-two weeks, under the direction of Mrs. C. M. STEELE, as Principal, who will be aided by competent assistant teachers.

This Seminary is pleasantly and healthfully located on Niagara street, about one mile beyond the limits of the city of Buffaloe, at a point that overlooks Lake Erie and the Niagara River. The buildings are sufficiently commodious to afford a comfortable home for a large number of pupils.

Pupils are received at any time during the session, and are only charged from the time they enter the Institution.

For board, washing, and tuition in all the the English studies, 112 dollars per annum. The extra charges are, for music on thc Piano, 10 dollars per quarter; on the Organ or Harp, 15 dollars; on the Guitar, 8 dollars; the German or French Langirage, 7 dollars and 50 cents; Drawing and Painting, 5 dollars.

Circular pamphlets containing further particulars may be obtained by applying to the Principal or either of the Trustees.

Black Rock, February, 1849.

TERMS.

FEMALE ECLECTIC INSTITUTE,

NEAR FRANKFORT, KY. THE THIRTY-FIFTH Session of this well known establishment will open on the Íst day of January, 1849. That the advantages it offers may b- more extensively enjoyed, forty young ladies will be adınitted, instead of the limited number heretofore received; and, that every necessary attention may be bestowed upon them, JAMES S. Fall, A. M.,'a 'graduate of Bethany College, and for two years past; Professor of Ancient Languages in Franklin College, Tennessee, will be, hereafter, associated with myself in the instruction and direction of the school. Fifteen of the young ladies will board in the family of Mr. James Fall, whose residence adjoins my own. Here they will be surrounded byevery necessary comfort, and will enjoy, at the same time, all the benefits of the school.

The Greek, Latin, French, and German Languages, as well as an enlarged Mathematical course, when desired, will be critically and thoroughly taught, without extra charge. The superb suit of apparatus, imported from London and Paris at an expense of about $9000 dollars, affords means for illustrating, in the fullest and inost interesting manner, aļl the departments of physical science in which-instruetion is given.

Terms, as for many years; and, with full particulars, made known on application to

P. S. FALL, Frankfort, Kentucky.

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TRACTS FOR THE PEOPLE-No. XXXII.

BAPTISM-No. XX.

DESIGN OF BAPTISM-No. I. Every divine institution has its own specific design. They all indeed, have one grand general design;—the glory of God and the happiness of man. But as neither the glory of God, nor the happi. mess of man consists in one item or in one manifestation, his precepts and our acts of obedience are necessarily both numerous and various. Nature and religion being the offspring of the same sapremely wise and benevolent mind, may be supposed to carry in them conclusive evidence of the same divine original. Hence, the numerous and various parables and allusions to nature on the part of the great Teacher, while developing that gracious institution, of which he is the beginning, middle, and end.

Now as in nature no one ordinance or institution can become a substitute for another, so in Christianity, no one ordinance can either be dispensed with or substituted for another, but at the detria ment and loss of the subject. There is a specific virtue in every ordinance of religion, as in every ordinance of nature. There is no substitute for air, light, heat, or moisture, in either the vegetable or animal kingdom; and there is no substitute for faith, repentance, and baptism in the present dispensation of grace. It is not for us to ask, nor is it due to us from God, to give the reason why. He ordains and commands blessings to be bestowed in his own way, and it is alike our duty and our happiness implicitly to obey and enjoy them. We have only to ascertain the fact that God has so commanded, and our duty then is to obey.

All the ordinances of Christianity are means of grace. Faith, repentance, baptism, the Lord's day, the Lord's supper, the church and its ministry are all means of grace. There are, indeed, many graces requisite to the completion and perfection of Christian char. SERIES III. 1.- VOL. VI.

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acter. There is the grace of faith-the grace of repentance-the grace of forgiveness—the grace of justification—the grace of sanctification--the grace of adoption—the grace of assurance--the grace of perfection-the grace of happiness. There are means of each and of all of these graces. Is there the grace of faith? There are the means of faith;—the well attested testimony of God. Is there the grace of repentance? There are the arguments drawn from our guilt and God's infinite mercy. Is there the grace of forgiveness? There are the blood of Christ, the love of God, and the promises addressed to our faith. Is there the assurance of pardon? There is baptism for the remission of sins; and as a consequence, the love of God shed abroad in our hearts by the Holy Spirit. Is there the grace of justification? There are the death of Christ, faith in it, repentance, and a baptism into his death. Is there the grace of adoption? There is the spirit of God, bearing witness with our spirit, that we are the sons of God. Is there the grace of perfection? There are the precepts, the example of Christ; the Lord's day, the Lord's supper, the fellowship and prayers of kindred spirits, and the obedience of faith. Is there the grace of happiness? Then there are the love of God shed abroad in the heart, the favor of the Lord Jesus Christ, and the communion of the Holy Ghost--a pledge and an earnest of the eternal rest.

But we have now before us the special design of baptism, as the assurance of remission, a pledge of pardon, of our burial with Christ, and our resurrection to a new life. This is “baptism for the remission of sins.” That baptism was designed for the remission of sins, for a pledge and an assurance of pardon, through the Messiah, our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, we shall now first proceed to prove.

1. Testimony of the Harbinger himself-"In those days came John the Baptist; the voice of one crying in the wilderness, Prepare ye the way of the Lord ! Make his paths straight. John did baptize in the wilderness and preach the baptism of repentance for the remission of sins.” Mark, the evangelist, chap. i. 2, 3, 4.

2. Luke also affirms, chap. iii. 3. “And he came into all the country about the Jordan preaching the baptism of repentance for the remission of sins.”

3. Peter, to whom the keys or the approaching Reign of Heaven were committed by the Lord in person, in opening the gospel kingdom when first asked by penitent believers what they should do in order to remission, answers-

--“Repent,” or reform, “and be baptized, every one of you, in the name of the Lord Jesus, for the remission of sins." Acts, ii. 37.

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