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33.
The goose, on finding him so obstinate,

Stretch'd out his leg, and opening wide his paw,
Again dash'd Dan at his accustom'd rate

Down through the air. The goose above him saw
His body splash within the waves, and strait

A whirling eddy oped its ravening maw :
But all Dan suffer'd from his evil luck
In upper air, was nothing to this duck.

34.
He felt the waters compass him about,

Ring in his ears, and gurgle in his throat ;
And every wave would dash the luckless lout.

Bump on a rock, or some long founder'd boat.
He flung his arms around him, sinewy, stout,

And to the surface oft essay'd to float:
While every monster of the deep, with grim
And fiery eyes, gaped awfully at him.

35.
At one time he was thrown upon the mud,

But the next wave upraised him in a dash;
He saw upon his arms the streaming blood,

Where fishes bit;--and now another splash
Would fling him back again to where he stood

But just before ; when suddenly a crash
Of thunder bursts above; a known salute
Deafens his ear,“ Take that, and that, you brute.

36.
“ You do not care how you desert your door,

You dirty, drunken, beastly-looking sot!
Oh! woe's the day I ever met you, sure,

And when I wed you, 'twas a bitter lot:-
Get up there, from that filthy, dabbled floor;

If served aright, you should rest there to rot.”
Dan rubb’d his eyes, leap'd up, and, with a scream
Sung out, “ Where am I, arrah? 'TWAS A DREAM.”-

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37.
The fact was, Mistress Rourke and Mistress Blake,

Who were as constant cronies as their mates,
And often at their cabins met to take

A cup of tea, when granted by the Fates,
This evening met; and having vowed to wreak

Their vengeance on their guilty husbands' patęs,
Furnish'd with washing-tub, or pail quite crazy,
Follow'd our heroes to the MOUNTAIN TAISY.

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39. But when he saw 'twas neither shark nor whale,

But Judy his own wife, in act to cast -
Right on his dripping pate a second pail,

A bumper just as brimful as the last,
He brush'd aside, light as a mountain gale,

And 'scaped the waterspout, which by him past; “ Leave off," says he, “ and better manners learn: O Judy, Judy, why art thou so stern?"-*

40. “ How can you ask?” quoth she, “ you drunken dog,

Who never come beneath this wicked roof, That you can move away, but like a log,

Lie quite knock'd up, and helpless. Keep aloof From Mountain daisies--that you shall, you hog,

Next time I cateh you this way, hand and hoof 111 have you pinion'd smartly, I engage : You know not.yet what 'tis to rouse my rage.”

41. “ Och! peace !" says Dan ; I promise on my word,

Never to drink as I have done to-night ; But 'twas no joke or rather 'twas absurd,

To souse me so with water : such a fright
I got as made me dream that things occurr'd

Queerer than ever chanced to mortal wight:
So don't be angry any more, but come,
Come home, my heart, and do not look so grum."-

42.
This said he stagger'd forward, caught his wife

Full in his arms, and smack'd her with a kiss ; (The plan most excellent, upon my life,

Of stopping women's angry mouths is this,)
When Mrs Blake return'd, for mischief rife,

Her hands of water full, of fire her phiz :
But Judy, who had grown quite soft and loving,
Begg'd off poor Paddy in a style most moving.

43.
What points she urged-how Mrs Mulshenan

Vapour'd about the honour of her houseHow Mrs Blake's well practised clapper ran,

Reviling men addicted to carouseHow she at last was pacified-how Dan

Begg’d (but in vain) permission from his spouse To take for fear of cold, but one more glass Being in haste I here beg leave to passi

44. In fine, they routed Blake, who stretch'd along

The hearth was dreaming, but more pleasantly, And sallying out, moved off the staggering throng,

(For, entre nous, the girls had spiced their tea.) But, spite of vows, next night, believe my song,

The friends attack'd the grog, and gallantly
Got drunk again--the which I do attest:
I have it from authority the best.

MORAL OF THE WHOLE POEM.
ΑΡΙΣΤΟΝ ΜΕΝ ΥΔΩΡ. .

PINDAR. MANKIND! ye learn from this with truth, that slaughter Of brandy can't be cured by pails of water.

* See Milman's Samor, the Lord of the Bright City.

“O duty, duty, why art thou so stern !Somewhat similar. I prefer my own.

Erplicit. Daniel O'Rourke is at length concluded.

The composition of this poem has beguiled many a weary moment, and, I trust, purified by the sweet sentimentalities of poetry many an hour which might else have been devoted to subjects less sacred. That it can make a deep and lasting impression on the morals of my country, is my wish, though my modesty forbids me to say my expectation : but if one reader rises from its perusal with a heart better adapted for the reception of the sublime and devotional-if one spirit has been refreshed by the inspiration of holy musings while reading it if one better citizen, one better man, has been made by the work I have just finished, I shall not look upon my labour to have been in vain.

F. O'FOGARTY.

SONNET.
FOGARTY! FRIEND AND PARTNER OF MY HEART,

GLORY OF BLARNEY's casTELLATED TOWN;

NOW THAT THY POEM, WORK OF 'HIGH RENOWN,
EQUALLY DEAR TO NATURE AS TO ART,
TO BYRON AS TO BOWLES, HAS FOUND AN END,

I HAIL THEE IN THIS SONNET, BARD DIVINE !

IN VERSE PERHAPS NOT DELICATE OR FINE,
BUT HONEST, SUCH AS FRIEND SHOULD WRITE TO TRIEND!
HIGH ABOVE EARTH, THY FAME SHALL MOUNT, AS HIGH

AS O'ER THE BOTTLE SHOOTS THE ASPIRING CORK,
WHEN GAS CARBONIC MAKES IT FORTH TO FLY

FROM THE CLOSE FLASK WHERE STREAMS OF SODA 'WORK,
LEAVING THE FIZZING FUME BEHIND, SO THOU
SHALT O'ER THE MURMURING CROWD TO ETHER PLOUGH.

Quoth Thos. JENNINGS,
Founder of the Soda-Water School of Poetry.

[In addition to the Sonnet presented to us by the great Bard of Soda, we have been favoured with the following lines from the able pen of a favourite Correspondent. We trust our friend Mr Fogarty's notorious and national modesty will not be put to the blush by the well-deserved encomiums contained in them.-C. N.)

TO FOGARTY O'FOGARTY, ESQ. OF BLARNEY.
BARD of the West ! thy lay shall still be read
Long as a mountain-daisy rears its head;
Long as the moon shall gild the glowing scene;
Long as her man shall o'er her surface reign;
Long as an eagle dwells near Bantry Bay;
Long as towards heaven he wings his airy way;
Long as a goose a cackling cry shall give,
(That is at least while Wood and Waithman live ;)
Long as a wife shall chide her drunken lord,
When in an alehouse she beholds him floor'd.

While England's tongue survives or, what's the same,
While North's great Work keeps flourishing in fame,
So long shalt thou, my Fogarty, impart
Ecstatic pleasure to the feeling heart.
And ages yet unborn, and lands unknown,
Shall chaunt thy verses in melifluous tone;
And pilgrims shall from far Kentucky roam,
Or from still farther Australasia come,
Or Melville Island, in the icy foam,
That they, with thirsty reverent eye, may see
The scenes immortalized by Fogarty!

Quoth D. DICK,
Of the C. X. and S. $.

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BRIEF ABSTRACT OF MR O'FOGARTY'S JOURNAL On looking over my journal I find was a gentleman of good family resiit so barren of incident, that I do not ding in the Old Town of Edinburgh, think it worth my while to send it where his wealth, talents, and general entire. Take then this short abstract. virtues, render him the life of society

, On the 5th ult. I rose after nearly and the idol of Auld Reekie. He four months' confinement to bed. I amuses himself, I continued, by conhad experienced a sad randling during ducting the greatest literary work of that time. My skin like a lady's loose modern times—by which he makes gown hung about me-my jaws were about six thousand a-year,* (was I drawn in-my face hatchety-my eyes right?) which, as well as his private sunk and hollow—and my clothes in- property, (a very considerable one,) he vested my once goodly person with as spends in such a bounteous hospitality

, little congruity as a flour-bag would that he is in general suspected to be an act the part of waistcoat to a spit. Irishman.“Yes," said my noble friend, The entries for a week in my diary, “my son, who was, you know, of Execonsist chiefly of notes of squabbles ter, Oxon, told me he heard as much with my doctors-who one and all from a friend of his, Mr Buller, of seemed "leagued in a conspiracy to Brazen Nose, who spent some days, a starve me. I was firm, however, and couple of years ago, with him on a succeeded in unkennelling them;

from party in the Highlands, when Lord which day I got visibly better. I was Fife, Prince Leopold, and other dissoon able to despatch my commons tinguished persons, were part of his with my usual activity. My person company.

He had with him at that acquired its wonted amplitude and time a pleasant, and very prime my eye resumed its old fire. I could poet, of the name of Hogg, in his give a halloo with ancient fortitude train, of whom Buller told queer stoof lungs, and in fact was completely ries. My son, who was a crackre-established. On the 14th, while I man in Oxford, had an idea of contriwas in the act of polishing the wheel buting to North, but since he has been of my salmon-rod, my old friend, the returned for this ruinous county,

he Earl of ******** called on me en pas- he has not an hour to himself." In sant. “ The good-natured, black- this way his Lordship and I beguiled whiskered,” (to speak regally, for it an hour, chatting about the two prowas by this title, you know, the King minent subjects of discourse in Ireland addressed him on the pier at Howth,) at present, his Majesty (if indeed it was delighted to see me pulling up, be proper to call the King a subject) and congratulated me on my recovery. and the Magazine. He pressed me He told me all the Dublin chit-chat hard to go with him to Myros, offerabout his Majesty, who, he said, was ing me his carriage, if I did not find quite pleased at meeting him, and myself well enough to bestride my. shook his hand with the utmost cordi- chesnut, Donnelly, but I then declined ality. I had many an anecdote from it. I am, however, there this moment, him which escaped the knowledge of and am writing this Journal in great the mere mob.” The king's private haste in his library, on some of his parties were quite au fuit—and he best wire-wove. On the 15th, Father captivated those who had the honour Buzzhun, with whom I have corresof being admitted to his own imme- ponded from the commencement of diate circle, as effectually as in public my poem, wrote me from Glangariffe

, he by his demeanour won the hearts enclosing some Latin verses, narrating of the rest of the population. Our the catastrophe of the poem in a difconversation then turned upon my ferent manner. To oblige the old genpoem, of which he, like every body tleman, I put them in my notes ; they else, spoke in terms of the highest appear to me to be as good as Frere's

, commendation-but modesty forbids in his 3d Canto of Whistlecraft

, me to detail what he said on this which, after all, is the best and most point. But who the devil, says his pleasantly humorous thing in the Lordship, is North? I told him he ottava rima. From this to the 29th, I

* Considerably under the mark. C. N.

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spent my time in ranging the hills, pulled, and a ball in the evening, glens, and bogs, to the devastation of flanked by a supper by no means to

the feathered tribes, and the demoli- be sneez’d at. There was a good deal of i tion of the dinners of my friends. I singing-none, however, equal to a am once more stout as buck or bear_ Braham's. I have a great mind to Fogarty's himself again, as I display- write a full account of this affair, as I ed on the 25th, (the day of Crispin think it would make a decentish arCrispian, as Harry the Fifth remarks,) ticle for the Star of Edina. Thorp at a great dinner party on the rocks, sung, pretty well, a song of his own where I played a knife and fork to composition, in honour of the Coronathe manifest astonishment of the na- tion-day. It is well enough for one not tive tribes. We were quite jolly,- yet hardened in the ways of poetry. boat-race in the morning, right well

1.
“ Come round me, ye lads, that I value the best,
From the mountains, the valleys, the east, and the west,
For this is the day that our monarch has been
Crown's King of Great Britain and Erin the green.

2.
« Then why should not we, in a full flowing cup,
Drink a health to King George in a long choking sup?
For we are the lads can drown sorrow and spleen,
When we thus meet together to sport on the green.

3.
“ This day is a glorious one, boys-let us quaff
Our primest of liquors, be merry, and laugh;
And when we have drain'd off our bottles quite clean,
We'll hop off to the girls, and we'll dance on the green.

4.
“Let Lords, Dukes, and Earls, keep feasting away-
Let the shrih-trumpetsound, and the champion's horse neigh-
Let ladies in diamonds adorn the scene
We'll have mirth here at home, and our dance on the green.

5.
“ We have ladies as lovely and brilliant as they,
Though no jewels are borrow'd to make them look gay;
Their eyes are the diamonds that sparkle so keen,
When lit up by love in the dance on the green.

6.
* We have Princes in plenty among us, 'tis true
Of good fellows, I mean, and but rivall’d by few;
The goblet's our star, and our ribbon is seen
Round the waists of our sweethearts, who dance on the green.

7.
“ Then come, let us close with LongLife To Our King,
And then, each a champion, his glove let him fling,
To the fair one who rules o'er his heart as the queen;

And, till Sol's in the ocean, we'll dance on the GREEN.” It is superfluous to say that the even- are the most personally abusive ani. ing was spent quite in a genteel man- mals of the species. They only cry now ner, and that many gentlemen, of the because they are hurt. I perceive ramost sagacious understandings, were ther an impertinent allusion to my poehighly indebted to the intellectual try, by Mr Trott of London. I know faculty of their horses in their return that shaver. I remember one night, or homeward.

morning, after coming from the eccenOn the 26th, I got the last Number trics, meeting him at the Cyder Celby express, and a right good one it is. lar, in a state of civilation ; and he was But what a sputter about personalities! so impertinent about Hireland, that, If I were in North’s place, I should to avoid disputes, I was obliged to not give myself a moment's uneasiness throw him up stairs into the street. about the crying out of the whigs, who This is the meaning of his slap at Blar

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