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4,149

4,378

5, 316

735, 454

4,821
414, 222
196, 515

754, 666
198,774

698, 076

5,967 667,387 180, 279

6,793 655, 719 179, 022

7,295 632, 863 175, 372

198,995

190,068

Total.
Employees-Middle of month

count: (average)... Employees, train and engine i

(average).. Man-hours actually worked,

train and engine service em

ployees Number of locomotive and

motor train-miles (in thousands)...

1,528, 173 1,502,097 1,468, 882 1,454, 224 1,375, 609 1,345,695 1,272,732

930, 819

942, 511

945, 137

990, 871

930, 437

941, 416

895, 026

1 Class I including switching and terminal.

ATTACHMENT A-3-TRAIN ACCIDENTS, ADJUSTED AS TO AAR COST INDEX

Year

AAR 1

AAR 1
index

index
(1957-59=100) (1961 =100)

Adjusted a
reporting
threshold

Train acci-
dents that
would not
have been

reported
(with adjusted

threshold)

Total train
accidents
actually
reported

Adjusted

train accidents

Adjusted train accidents (percent

increase over 1961)

1961.. 1962.. 1963. 1964. 1965. 1966 1967.

108.2
110.2
111.1
113.1
118.2
121.7
128.6

100.0
101.9
102.9
104.5
109.2
112.5
118.9

$750.0
763.9
770.1
783.9
819.3
843.6
891.4

29
40
57
170
251
428

4,149 4, 378 4, 821 5, 316 5, 967 6, 791 7, 294

4,349 4,781 5, 259 5,797 6, 540 6,866

15 27 40

1 Railroad material prices and wage rates,
Reflecting increased cost of labor, material, and fuel.

ATTACHMENT A-4-ADJUSTED TRAIN ACCIDENTS, RELATED TO TRAIN AND CAR MILES AND GROSS TON MILES

Total gross

Year

Total train

miles
(million)

Adjusted
train acci-

dents per million train

miles

Car miles (millions)

Adjusted train accidents per million car

miles

ton miles
(billions)

Adjusted train acci

dents per billion gross ton miles

1961.
1962.
1963.
1964.
1965.
1966.
1967

930.8
944.5
945.1
990.8
930,4
941.4
895.0

4.46
4.60
5.05
5.31
6. 20
6.95
7.65

29, 309 29, 814 30, 115 30, 810 31, 111 32, 038

14.1 14.3 15.9 17.1 16.8 20.4

1, 628 1,679 1, 721 1, 784 1.835 1,913 1, 765

2,55 2.59 2.75 2.95 3.14 3.41 3.92

1 Not available.

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Total....

All other causes (including unknown)...

Grand total.....

587 647 702 855 1, 148

863 1.007 1,027 1,221 1.340

4,149 4,378 4,822 5,317 5,967

1, 428

1,523

6,793

ATTACHMENT C-1-EMPLOYEE CASUALTY RATE PER MILLION MAN-HOURS WORKED, 1961-66

1963

1964

1965

1966

1962 Killed Injured

Killed

Injured

Killed

Injured

Killed

Injured

1961 Killed Injured

0.21 10.76 .06 9.63 .02 9.64

04 9.07 . 15 25.09

0.25 .06 .04 .00 .25

10.51 9. 19 9.67

Killed Injured 0.17 10.64 .09 9.57 .02 9.12 12 10.05 21 24.60

0.29

06
04
08
20

11.85 10.04 9.01 9. 40 25.93

0.22 .07 .04

04 .23

10.76 8. 85 8.97 8.91 25. 97

0.18

08
.03
04
.22

10.76 9. 48 7.56 9.17 25.60

23.92

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ATTACHMENT C-2-EMPLOYEE CASUALTIES BY EMPLOYMENT AND RELATED TO OPERATING FACTORS, 1961-67

1962

1963

1964

1965

1966

1967

[graphic][graphic]

Class of employee

III. Maintenance of way and structures
IV. Maintenance of equipment and stores-

V. Transportation (other than train engine and yard employees).
Vl(a). Transportation (yardmasters, switchtenders, and hostlers)---
VICb). Transportation (train and engine service).

All employees.
Total man-hours (thousands).

1961

698, 076

667, 387

Average number of employees.
Casualties:

All employees on duty.
Average number of train service employees
Casualties: Train service employees....
Casualties:
Train service employees:

Per million train miles.
Per billion gross ton miles.

754, 666
1 130

2 18, 930
198,774
162 10, 410

735, 454
1 180 218, 210

198, 995
1972 10, 150

714, 222
1 164 2 18,473

196, 515
1 86 : 10, 561

1 178 2 19,028

190, 068
1 87 2 10,900

1 166 ? 17, 232

180, 279
1 88 210, 503

655,719
1 149 2 16,643

179, 022
185 2 10,299

632, 863
1 166 217,529

175, 372
183 2 10,027

10.06 2 10.0
1.03 25.73

1.10
1.06

29.5
? 5. 33

1.08
1.05

2 9.8
2 5. 39

1.08
1.04

2 9.7
25.38

2.09
1.04

29.7
24.93

1.08
1.04

29.4
34.64

1.09
1.05

2 11.2
2 5.68

1 Killed.

2 Injured.

ATTACHMENT D-1-RESULTS OF INSPECTIONS FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1961 THROUGH 1967

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ATTACHMENT D-2-LOCOMOTIVE ACCIDENTS AND CASUALTIES CAUSED BY FAILURE OF LOCOMOTIVE PARTS

OR APPURTENANCES, FISCAL YEARS 1961-66

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Number of accidents.
Percent increase.
Number of persons killed.
Percent increase.
Number of persons injured.
Percent increase..

71 5.9

0 0 98 34.2

87 14.5

0 -100

100

0

93 -3.1

77 -4.9

73 -5.2

96 -2.0

68 -26.9

Note: (-) Decrease.

The CHAIRMAN. I notice in your statement on page 15 you say:

We have not included the Hours-of-Service Act among those statutes to be replaced by the general authority proposed in the present bill. Our decision here was predicated in part upon the advice which the Interstate Commerce Commission furnished this committee to the effect that it was unable to establish any direct relationship between railroad accidents and the hours-of-service limitation.

Sometime toward the end of 1966 after extensive hearings on legislation having to do with the act, I wrote the chairman as follows:

While I appreciate that the testimony which you presented during the hearings was to the effect and did not possess sufficient information as to any opinion upon the provisions of section 281 of the bill that it should be approved, I should welcome your reviewing the body of information that you do have concerning it for the purpose of determining what relationships there may be with the hours of service.

To my knowledge I have not yet heard from the Commission in 1968 in response to this request made in 1966.

Inasmuch as thereafter the Bureau was transferred, have you carried anything out and do you know anything about this request?

Mr. LANG. I am familiar with the fact that such a request was made, Mr. Chairman, and I was advised by my people, and the people came over from the Commission, that they had taken another look at all the available statistics and they came to a conclusion. Why that information was not furnished to the committee, I cannot say. I myself during the last year have also asked my people to review this matter again, and again they have assured me that our present statistics and the information presently available to us does not support or oppose one way or another the contention that the length of service has some correlation with accidents. That is to say, our present statistics are just incapable of discerning any relationship there but they do not tell us that it does not exist,

they just say we cannot find it with these numbers.

The CHAIRMAN. Then you have the same group of men working for you that was working for the ICC when they made their request?

Mr. LANG. Yes.

The CHAIRMAN. You know at that time Chairman Bush said he did not have sufficient information, and I would think that within 2 years he would be able to get that information or somebody would be able to get it so they could make a reply to the committee one way or the other to let us know.

Mr. LANG. I think we would have to undertake to review the matter again, and we will advise you.

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