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The last point was disputed by the President, who adduced in support a paper on Ants by Sir John Lnbbock.

The proceedings terminated with the following exhibitions :-An Abyssinian Bible and Prayer-book exhibited by Hooper ; a Queen Termite, a petrified bird's-nest, and other curiosities, by D. A. Hailes; The Cocoon of the Club-horned Bee; some Snake's Eggs.

A Potato plant with the tubers above ground; A drawing of a branched specimen of Broomrapo (Orobanche minor) by F. E. Hulme, Esq.; a specimen of wood, coloured green by a fungus, exhibited by Reiss, a mummy Cat, some Bush string (the sinews of the Kangaroo's Tail) and a Swift's egg.

There were 72 persons present, 2 Honorary Members, 33 Members, and 37 Visitors.

On Saturday, July 13th, a small Expedition was made to Woodborough, on the invitation of the Rev. E. G. Wyld, the Rector, who pointed out the most favourable localities for Botanical and Geological work in the neighbourhood; the best thanks of the Society are due to Mr. and Mrs. Wyld for the kind way in which they entertained the party at tea afterwards. The day was very successful ; over 210 plants were found in flower, the wild Clematis being discovered in a new locality ; several rare moths were captured by F. S. Alston, and over 30 Entomological observations were made. The weather was not very favourable for Ornithology; and only a few fossils were obtained.

Near Alton a White Horse was passed, which dates trom the beginning of the Century.

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FOOTBALL.
Sabjoined are the accounts for the season 1877—8.
RECEIPTS.

£ s. d. Subscriptions for Christmas Term...

25 7 6 Lent Term

13 7 6 Midsummer Term

13 5 6 Balance from last Captain

13 16 6

Total expenditure Balance ...

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EDITORIAL.

ONCE more a Midsummer term had drawn to a close, and the Editor found himself sitting in judgment over many contributions both in

prose
and verse.

There was a goodly pile, and it was with feelings of deep pleasure that he perused each little fragment, and admiring its beauties, wondered why it had been reserved so especially for his enjoyment. There was such a variety in both departments: there was a charming poem in rhyming metre but without rhyme, there was a soft-love ditty without an incident. There was a lullaby mingled with lines from a familiar hymn, there was a fantastic dream which had a glance at the universe before the Garden of Eden existed, there was a fragment which ended with the suggestive words, “let me but die for I am past my day ;” the Editor was of a tender heart, he did not wish that so dolorous a fate should befall the composer ; yet he felt that there was some truth in those last five words, and drawing the moral said to

himself “How many a true word is uttered in jest.”

But the Editor was not selfish; some of the contributions, at least, had distinct merit and the school ought to have a glimpse at them.

And so first he turned to the Prose compositions. The longest of these was a description of a “Breton Fair." The author had been staying in Brittany and went to the fair of Sainte Anne. The festival was of a twofold nature and centred round a small Chapel in the interior of which prayers were being said, while outside Panoramas of the siege of Paris were being exhibited. The mixture of these two forms of entertainment “was very striking," but the conclusion was more so, for the men " wended their way home for the most part (as the author regretted to say), unconscious whether they were walking on their heads or their heels.” Thus ended the great fair of Sainte Anne, which the author considered not among the least of the attractions which Brittany offers the tourist.

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The last point was disputed by the President, who adduced in support a paper on Ants by Sir John Lnbbock.

The proceedings terminated with the following exhibitions :-An Abyssinian Bible and Prayer-book exhibited by Hooper ; a Queen Termite, a petrified bird's-nest, and other curiosities, by D. A. Hailes ; The Cocoon of the Club-horned Bee ; some Snake's Eggs.

A Potato plant with the tubers above ground; A drawing of a branched specimen of Broomrape (Orobanche minor) by F. E. Hulme, Esq.; a specimen of wood, coloured green by a fungus, exhibited by Reiss, a mummy Cat, some Bush string (the sinews of the Kangaroo's Tail) and a Swift's egg.

There were 72 persons present, 2 Honorary Members, 33 Members, and 37 Visitors.

On Saturday, July 13th, a small Expedition was made to Woodborough, on the invitation of the Rev. E. G. Wyld, the Rector, who pointed out the most favourable localities for Botanical and Geological work in the neighbourhood; the best thanks of the Society are due to Mr. and Mrs. Wyld for the kind way in which they entertained the party at tea afterwards. The day was very successful ; over 210 plants were found in flower, the wild Clematis being discovered in a new locality ; several rare moths were captured by F. S. Alston, and over 30 Entomological observations were made. The weather was not

very favourable for Ornithology; and only a few fossils were obtained.

Near Alton a White Horse was passed, which dates trom the beginning of the Century.

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Total expenditure
Balance ...

77 19 9
38 14 9

£116 14 6

(Signed) H. VASSALL, Hon. Sec.

(Audited) J. S. THOMAS, Bursar. Jane 21st, 1878.

The Race Committee beg to acknowledge the receipt of 6d. conscience money. July 8th, 1878.

H. VASSALL, Hon. Sec.

Printed by PERKINS & Son, at their General Printing Offices,

Waterloo House, Marlborough.

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OscE more a Midsummer term had drawn to a close, But the Editor was not selfish; some of the conand the Editor found himself sitting in judgment over tributions, at least, had distinct merit and the school many contributions both in prose and verse. There | ought to have a glimpse at them. was a goodly pile, and it was with feelings of deep And so first he turned to the Prose compositions. pleasure that he perused each little fragment, and The longest of these was a description of a “ Breton admiring its beauties, wondered why it had been Fair." The author had been staying in Brittany reserved so especially for his enjoyment. There and went to the fair of Sainte Anne. The festival was such a variety in both departments : there was was of a twofold nature and centred round a small a charming poem in rhyming metre but without Chapel in the interior of which prayers were being rhyme, there was a soft-love ditty without an in said, while outside Panoramas of the siege of Paris cident. There was a lullaby mingled with lines were being exhibited. The mixture of these two from a familiar hymn, there was a fantastic dream forms of entertainment " was very striking,” but the which had a glance at the universe before the conclusion was more so, for the men "wended their Garden of Eden existed, there was a fragment which way home for the most part (as the author regretted ended with the suggestive words, “let me but die for I to say), unconscious whether they were walking on am past my day;" the Editor was of a tender heart, he their heads or their heels." Thus ended the great did not wish that so dolorous a fate should befall the fair of Sainte Anne, which the author considered composer ; yet he felt that there was some truth in not among the least of the attractions which Brittany those last five words, and drawing the moral said to offers the tourist.

However there was a certain merit about this is men dancing and fighting, sowing, and hunting, contribution, and but little fault to be found, except eating and sleeping, and last, but not least, dying anıl that it was of considerable length and there was a being born.” We can only apprehend that some very certain lack of incident; and it is for this reason that little boy suffered a restless night, after the unusual such descriptions are always especially hard to excitement of the lecture delivered last term on th: render interesting.

Railroad in question. And we hope that th: Our next contribution is of a different nature. lecturer may not again visit Marlborough, lest an. It was with some difficulty that the Editor could other little sufferer be similarly affected. decipher it; it appeared to be in a strange dialect, We will now pass to the other department, whichi which was unknown to him. The first words were is considerably superior to the efforts in prose. apparently French, the next sentence in broken Our first contribution is a short poem on the Dart, English. The apparent aim and object of the com which the author compares to the Rhine, twice in a position was to introduce a not very amusing pun stanza. The poem, however, is by no means to be upor. the word Cheap-side; the hero of the tale asks ridiculed, and were it devoid of one pecularity, for the “Hotel de Vil,” and in reply is told, "dat would have found a place in the columns of the dare is no Cheap's Hotel in Paree, do there is Cheap- || Marlburian. This peculiarity is “ That though side in Londres." We cannot help fearing that this written in what should be a rhyming metre, it does joke must have been perpetrated by the erratic not rhyme," and yet it is by no means modelled on genius, who offered it for the public enjoyment. And the Psalms. We will quote one verse to show the for the advice of future contributors, we may suggest style :that to misspell words, though sometimes unavoid “ Than Sharpham woods, where find a fairer scene, able, is not a very high form of jest, and that such Through Italy, or by the German Rhino, puns as the above quoted are perhaps more amusing In adoration to the stream's bright course, to the genius which creates it, than to the “profanum

The trees bow down and touch the water's side." vulgus."

Onr next coutribution is that to which we have We have a misgiving that our next prose com already referred, as the love ditty without an incident. position was by the same pen: there is the same The poem is written in hexameters, and describes a luxuriance of fancy unrestrained by the sobering summer evening, and a boat “ filled with a joyous effect of reason. It is that which few Marlburiaps crew of youths and maidens rejoicing.” The sun are spared for a whole year, viz., "A Dream.” In went down, the waters were hushed, and a maiden dreams there is an unbounded scope for imagination, voice was heard singing a song, of which we will which, in the present instance, has been almost un. quote one stanza:mercifully taken advantage of. The author was in

" Then o'er mom'ry steal a Pullman's car, on the great Pacific line before the

Days long gone by, creation of the animal world. The anachronism

Once more I seem to feel seemed a little bold even for a dream ; but what

Love's presence nigh." dreamer ever hesitated at an anachronism ? In the When suddenly the roar of thunder is heard and space of a few moments, the dreamer saw “Forests the lightning flashes forth. Ah! thought the Editor, c nturies old, lo! and animals ah! and smoke, red | as he hardly could repress a tear, the maiden will be

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