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C. Christopherson, E. L. Orde, D. Dobie, D. Ellison, E.

Peake, W. S. Goddard, A. Bowden. Smith, L. R. Furneaux, 2.- Pianoforte-Solo......" The Last Hope" ......... Gottschalk. 3.-Song.................." The Shipright”............J. L. Molloy

R. D. Curtler. 4.- Part-Song ....... " Open Air Songs ” ........ Mendelssohn. M. Rogers, P. H. Eliot, E. M. R. Cox, B. Vaughan-Johnson,

C. Christopherson, E. L. Ordo, D. Dobie, D. Ellison, E.

Peake, W. S. Goddard, A. Bowden-Smith, L. R. Farneaux 5.--- Reading............" The Bashful Man ”............. Mackenzie.

C. R. Fowler. 6.–Violin Solo.......... “Il Trovatore" ... ...... ... ... ... ... Verdi,

G. D. Petrie. 7.-Song ............."The Tar's Farewell” .....Stephen Adams.

A. W. Arkle. 8.–Part-Song......" Accorrete "...from Flotow's...“ Martha.' M. Rogers, P. H. Eliot, E. M. R. Cox, B. Vanghan-Johnson,

C. Christopherson, E. L. Orde, D. Bobie, D. Ellison, A. Bowden. Smith, L. R. Farneaux, A. W. Arkle, R. D.

Curt ler, E. Peake, W. S. Goddard, L. J. Dobie. 10. -Part-Song..." Nursery Rhyme Quadrilles "...J. Farmer. M. Rogers, P. H. Eliot, E. M. R. Cox, B. Vaughan-Johnson,

C. Christopherson, E. L. Orde, D. Dobie, D. Ellison, E. Peake, W. S. Goddard, A. Bowden-Smith, L. R. Furneaux.

practice of stamping the feet in time with music wbich has a marked beat, or a little resembles dance-music, will not again be allowed to jar upon the nerves of all who really care for listening. Perhaps the offenders really wish to dance, and would prefer the Pulcinellotrumpet of the Italian whose feelings Mr. Browning so graphically describes :" Bang.whang.whang goes the drum, tootle-te-tootle the fife ; No keeping one's baunches still ; it's the greatest pleasure

in life.” Those who care for those lesser thirds so plaintive, sixths diminished, sigh on sigh, might have their turn another day.

But to the subject. The glees were on the wholo very creditably performed. Mendelssohn's beautiful “ Farewell to the Forest” was correctly sung, if with. out much feeling ; we noticed the singing of the altos as particularly good ; the tenors were a little over. powering in the forte passages. The same author's “The Nightingale" and " Vale of Rest” were like. wise fair, though there was some slurring at the finish of the first, and very little attempt to do justice to the repeated crescendoes which form a marked beauty in the second. But quite the hit of the evening was the Part-song from Flotow's “Martha" (Accorrete, giovinette); the lightness with which it was given, the excellent time and tune, were most enjoyable. Both in this and the 'Nursery Rhyme Quadrilles,' we should like to record our admiration for the life and vigour which Rogers threw into his part; among many good trebles he was conspicuously good.

The soloists were Curtler, Peake, and Arkle. We were not impressed by any but the last, who sang one of those pretty waltz-like songs which are always effective on first hearing, but are apparently 80 difficult to sing in time—so the audience imaginewithout assistance. Kite's pianoforte solo was given with his usual precision and careful execution. Petrie gave us an arrangement for solo violin from Verdi's Il Trovatore ; in this we missed the delicacy of touch and sureness of phrasing which should mark violin-playing; the attempt seemed rather beyond the performer's powers, though it gave evidence of much promise. Last, Fowler read us “The Bashful Man" with much spirit; no fault indeed could be found with the rendering; the only question which occurred to us was whether the piece, not remarkable for delicacy of wit, was worthy of the reader.

PROGRAMME. 1.- Part Song ......" Farewell to the Forest" ...Mendelssohn. M. Rogers, P. H. Eliot, E. M. R. Cox, B. Vaughan-Jobnson,

Cricket.

M.C.C.C. v. E. E. MONEY'S TEAM.

This match was played on Saturday, July 13th. The weather was all that could be wished for, and although Money did not bring such a strong team as he at first intended, it proved enough for us, who lost the valuable services of Gostenhofer. Our opponents won the toss and sent in T. W. Weeding and E. E. Money to face the bowling of Napier and BowdenSmith. The former soon succumbed to BowdenSmith, and was followed by his brother, W. B. Money, who from his Cambridge reputation appeared a formidable antagonist. Before, however, be succeeded in getting double figures he was caught off Peake. Weeding meanwhile was playing very carefully, at the same time making use of his height to panish loose balls. Miles followed Money and got 10, including one 4, before he was taken by Law off Napier. Weeding was then caught by Stanton off Peake for a well-compiled 34. The next stand was made by Domville and Taylor, who got together and defied all the efforts of the bowlers. Just after lunch Domville was given not out to an appeal for a catch at the wicket, and shortly after Taylor was caught by Womersley off Peake for 17. Wilkins succeeded him, and before he returned a ball to Law for 11, Domville was caught in the slips off Peake for a very good innings of 36, including 3 fours, 2 threes, and 7 twos. The innings closed for 139.

When after a short pause Hayes and Jacson appeared at the wickets for the School, Miles (slow left hand) and Taylor (fast) began the bowling, and in his first over Hayes put one into point's hands off Miles. Law joined Jacson, and here a stand was made, both batsmen combining good defence with hitting powers. The judicious way in which they let alone Miles' balls on the off, which were bowled for catches, brought on a change in W. B. Money, who proved invincible with his lobs. He 800n caught and bowled Jacson, who had made 27, including a six, five, three, and 5 twos. Napier followed, but soon succumbed to the same bowler. Leach joined Law, who managed again to get his leg in front of the wicket, and retired for a wellplayed 28. Rogers came in next, and shortly after Leach returned a ball to Money. Womersley and Armstrong failed to score, and Stanton joined Rogers, and after a short stand was made the latter was Deatly caught at mid-wicket off Money, for 21, comprising 1 four, 2 threes, 3 twos. Peake made 8, and Stanton was caught off Miles for 14, including a four. The innings closed for 113, leaving the visitors vic. tors in the 1st innings by 26 runs.

There was still some time left, so our opponents

went in again. The most noticeable innings were those of Weeding, who got 16, W. B. Money 15, and Taylor, who played a very slashing game for 35, including a five, four, 3 threes, 4 twos. They all got out for 103, when stumps were drawn. Subjoined is the score :

E. E. MONEYS TEAM. T. W. Weeding, o. Stanton, b. Peake 34 b. Napier......... 16 E. E. Money, c. Stanton, b. Bowden. Smith .............

........ 0 b.Bowden-Smith 6 W. B. Money, o. Bowden-Smith • b. Peake

... 9 b. Napier ......... 15 R. F. Miles, c. Law, b. Peake ...... 10 oStanton,bNapier 6 G. H. Hodgson, b. Peake ........... 7 b. Napier ......... 0 A. C. Bartholomew, c. Jacson, b.

Peake ....................................... 2 not ont ............ H. W.J.Domville, c. Bowden.Smith b. Peake....

36 c.Law,b.Bowden.

Smith... ........ 2
E.F. Tayler, c. Womersley b Peake 17 c.Rogers, b. Law 35
C. A. Wilkins, c. & b. Law ............. 11 ran out ...........
A. Tanner, b Peake..................... 3 b. Law ............ 5
G. W. Drammond, pot out ............ 2 b. Napier ......... 4
Extras ............. 3

103
M.C.C.C.
S. H. Hayes, c. Wilkins, b. Miles.........
0. F. Jacson, c. & b. W, B. Money.........
C. Law, 1.b.w. b. W. B. Money ............. 28
J. R. Napier, b. W. B.Money.............
1. Leach, c. & b. W. B. Money ............ 7
G. S. Rogers, c. Miles, b. W. B. Money... 21
D. Womersley ht. wkt., b. W. B. Money 0
O.R.Armstrong,cWeeding, b.W.B.Money 0
H. E. Stanton, c. Weeding, b. Miles...... 14
E. Peake, b. W. B. Money ..................
A. Bowden-Smith, not out..................

Extras ...............

139

103

M.C.C.C. v. MR. W. J. FORD'S XI.

This match was played on July 17th and 18th, and resulted in a victory for Mr, Ford's XI by 7 wickets.

The College won the toss and determined to go in first, but no one seemed to be able to make any stand against the deadly bowling of A. Ford who bowled 8

D. Womersley, b. A. Ford............ 18 c. Leaf, b. A.Ford 25 G. S. Rogers, b. a. Ford ............ O cDouglas-Hamil.

ton, b. A. Ford 18 H. E. Stanton, not out ................ 7 run out ............ 3 C. L. Booth, b. A. Ford.............. O not out ............ E. Peake, b. Taylor..................... 4 b. A. Ford......... A. Bowden-Smith, o.Way, b A. Ford 0 b. Taylor ......... 6

Extras .......................... 3 Extras ...... 8

148

MR. W. J. FORD'S XI. Rev. A. S. Batson, c. Leach, b.

Bowden-Smith ....................... 38 not ont ............ 17 Mr. C. Sankey, b. Napier ............ 2 o. Booth, b. Peake 13 Rev. Douglas-Hamilton, b. Napier.. 2 Mr. H. Leaf, c. Law, b. Peake ...... 14 A. Ford, c. Bowden-Smith, b.

Peake...................................... 9 not out ............. Mr. W. Ford, c. Womersley, b.

Napier ................................... 11 Mr. J. P. Way, c. Peake, b. Napier 26 Rev. E. K. Browne, b. Napier ...... 0 W. Taylor, b. Napier ...... ........... 0 H. A. Eyre, not out .................. 5 o Jacson, b.Napier 6 H. D. P. Kitcat, b. Napier ............ O C. W. Ford, b.

Napier ......... 22 Extras

19 Extras ......

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wickets for only 17 runs. Womersley was the only one who reached double figures, and the invings closed for the miserable total of 45.

Our opponents then went in, sending Rev. A. S. Batson and Mr. Sapkey to the wickets. The latter was shortly bowled by Napier, but the former, after being badly missed on the off side, for a long time defied all further attempts of the bowlers till at last he put up another catch off the slows, which this time was held. A. Ford was disposed of for 9, and Mr. W. Ford for 11, after making a file square leg hit for 5. Mr. Way then gave some trouble to the bowlers, but was at last caught off Napier.

The innings closed for 126, leaving the School 82 to get to save the innings.

There was still some time left for play, so Hayes and Jacson again went in, but both shortly succumbed to Mr. Sankey. However, Napier and Womersley soon got together, and runs came pretty fast. This brought ou a change which proved effectual, as both the batsmen were successively caught off A. Ford. Then a stand was made by Rogers and Booth, and they kept up their wickets till it was time to draw the stumps.

Shortly after play was resumed on the next day Rogers gave a catch at the wicket which was well held; Peake and Bowden-Smith were disposed of for 7 and 6 respectively, and the innings closed for 148, Booth carrying out his bat after a capital innings for 36.

Mr. Ford's XI went in again with 68 runs to get, which they obtained with the loss of 3 wickets, Kitoat making 22, and Rev. A. 8. Batson 17 not out.

M.C.C.C. 0. F. Jacson, b. A. Ford............... 1 c. Batson, b.

Sankey ......... 3 S. H. Hayes, b. A. Ford..... ...... .. 2 o. & b. Sankey... O C. W. A. Law, o. Taylor, b. A. Ford 2 b. Taylor .......... J. R. Napier, b. A. Ford ............ 6 o. Taylor, b. A.

Ford ............. 28 H. Leach, .. Kitcat, b. Taylor ...... 3 c. & b. A. Ford... 3

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126

The Bile Corps.

WIMBLEDON, 1878.

On July 18th, one of the hottest days ever known oven at 'burning Wimbledon,' the VIII “came, and saw, and "-were sixth for the Ashburton Shield. This year by the new regulations 13 schools entered, but of the four new-comers Clifton alone defeated any of the older competitors.

At 11 a.m. the Schools paraded before the Secretary's Office and, after drawing lots for the targets, thence proceeded to the 200 yards range.

The heat was tremendous, and there was a great glare and “mirage,” with a most baffling light wind from the right front. Naturally the shooting gene

rally was poor, although Eton came to the front with a splendid score of 220, so that Marlborough did not do badly with 202, being nine points behind Charter honse. Richardson made a capital 29, and there were three scores of 27 each.

Then came the pleasant interlude of luncheon, which the kindness of Old Marlburians procured for all our VIII, with the Victoria Rifles.

The heat had by no means decreased when with full confidence we returned to shoot at 500 yards. There misfortunes overtook us in rapid succession . Balfour began brilliantly, had a bad cartridge, and fell to pieces. First Cross, then Dalton, and to consummate our miseries, Goddard failed to find the aiming at once, losing six shots between them before hitting the target. From third we sank to sixth, being only three points behind Rossall, our twice defeated foe, and five points behind Harrow, whom we must have beaten but for that perverse Nemesis which seems invariably to choose Wimbledon as the place to humble our pride after we have been lifted up by a series of victories elsewhere.

The finish between Eton and Charterhouse was very exciting, but the two last Carthusians failing to average the required 20, Eton were declared winners of the Shield for the third time, having won it before in 1868 and 1861. Winchester, shooting gallantly at 500 yards, were third.

The Spencer Cup was then shot for, and resulted in a tie of three scores of 27. In shooting it off a theory about the sighting cost Lamb his third Spencer Cup, which went to Glenalmond, the bottom school for the Shield. Heaton would have been fourth if he had not fired three shots at the wrong target. However, he deserves all credit for his plucky score for the Shield, especially as he only won his colours on the Tuesday previous, shooting two stages with Creeke for the eighth place. Dawson shot very creditably, especially at the long range,

and Goddard and Finch made 48 apiece. Everyone shot with great coolness and nerve throughout, and very carefully, although perhaps rather too fast.

The VIII deserve all possible praise for the energy which they have displayed throughout the season, hav. ing spared neither time nor personal inconvenience. Even position drill has been very well attended, with one exception. Other teams may have been more successful, none could have deserved success more.

The causes of our defeat are purely external, and are two in number.

1. Of course, the range. No grumble could be complete without this. But the only practicable and good site for a range (since all permanent erections on the Common are illegal) was selected, and the whole matter was handed over to the College “authorities ” before Christmas. Nothing whatever has yet been done. Whose fault is this ? Certainly not that of the captain or committee of the M.C.R.V.C.

2. At the beginning of the half only seven fellows had taken the trouble to attain such a moderate standard of proficiency that they had any chance of filling the six vacant places in the VIII. The nine did their utmost, but only luck as good as ours was bad could have brought such an VIII to the front at Wimbledon.

Unless the School support the Corps more heartily, and the Corps enter more generally into the competition for the VIII, we shall never win, even if we were to shoot at Wimbledon all the year round.

There will bo four places at least vacant in the VIII for next year, and at present there seem to be no probable competitors for them. The shooting team is always made or marred before Christmas.

Let those whom it ought to concern give ear.

Finally, our best thanks are due to the kindness of the Master, who allowed all the VIII one day's practice at Wimbledon, and more to the ailing mem

H. S. Sankey (Inns of Court) .........0225530302-22 Corp. Philpot (Oxford University)...2554344555—42 Sergt Dove (Cambridge University) 4435453553-41 Pue. Mathews (Victoria Rifles) ......50 13 455455-40 Capt. Jeston (Civil Service) .........3353552252–35

Tot

bers thereof. Also we must gratefully acknowledge the hospitality and great assistance rendered by the Old Marlburians, particularly the three ex-captains Sankey, Philpot, and Dove.

ASABURTON SHIELD.

200 yds. 500 yds.
Eton ................... 220 183 403
Charterhouse .......211
Winchester .........197

390
Harrow ............... 192 177 369
Rossall .................192 175 367
Marlborough .........202 162 364
Rugby ..............188 164 352
Clifton ...............192 159
Cheltenham ........168

331

183

391

193

On July 20th the Corps went to Battalion drill at Bowood. The whole Battalion was present, the weather was ultra-tropical, and the drill excellent After an apparently interminable series of manoeuvres we received some very great compliments and, what was more to the point, were allowed to return to Calne, where we did full justice to an excellent dinner. After the usual healths had been proposed, and songs sung, we returned to Marlborough, full of sentiments of mutual admiration.

351

163

SPENCER CUP.

500 yds. Pte. Montgomery (Glenalmond).........4451523--27 354–12 || Corp. White. Cooper (Charterhouse) ...5333454–27 234–9 Capt. Lamb (Cheltenhain) ...............4335441-27 042–6

M.C.R.V.C,

200 yds. 500 yds. Tot. Capt. Balfour................ 3533532-24 5503232--20 44 L.-Corp. Dawson .........+233433-22 2435553–27 49 Pte. Cross .................. 4343454—27 0050235--15 42 , Finch ...................3532324–22 25 15342—25 47 , Richardson............5443413--29 3222523-19 48 Sec. Lieut. Heaton ......3345345—27 2442552-24 51 L. Corp. Dalton............2333514—24 0002225—11 35 Serzt. Goddard ............4534533—27 0255 423—21 48

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The Veterans' Match was shot upon Joly 16th, when Marlborough was third. Philpot made the highest score in the match, Dove being equal second. Mathews suffered from a bad cartridge, his second shot. The full score is now published for the first time: Conditions-10 shots at 500 yards.

Cheltenham .......................... 187
Ragby ..... .................... .....185
Marlborough .....................180
Eton

................. ... ... 180
Charterhouse

................... Winchester ........................ 166 Harrow ...............................190

................148 Derby ............ ...............136

In the present state of the Corps, and special circumstances, the Committee have seen fit to divide the 'imperium' of drill and shooting for the present, but the old system will be again adopted as soon as possible.

Consequently the following promotions will be made :

Sergt. Chappel to be Captain
Sec.-Lieut. Heaton » Lieutenant
Sergt. Hume „ Sec.-Lieutenant
Corp. Nash » Colour-Sergt.
L.-Corp. Dawson » Sergeant
„ Hawkins „

Dalton

» Bowlby » » R. Dawson will act as Captain of the VIII and of Shooting for 1879, in the absence of Capt. Chappel.

Printed by Perkins & Son, at their General Printing Offices,

Waterloo House, Marlborough.

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