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That to each other, more and more,
Endeared we may grow:

4
Until our frail imperfect love

By steps upraised be,
From things below to things above,
And perfected in Thee.

5
Betwixt us let 'no jarrs be found,

Or breach of faith be fear'd; Within our walks, let not the sound Of bitter words be heard.

6 Preserve me from those peevish tricks,

Which merit Scorn or Hate, From all those Humours of my Sex, Which Wise-men's love abate.

7 Let this in mind be always had,

My Husband to prefer, The Woman for the Man was marle, And not the Man for Her.

8
And that my heart may not despise

His pleasure to fulfil ;
Let his commands be just and wise,

Discreet, and Loving, still.

XXI.

CONJUGAL DUTY.
FROM LOVE'S TRIALS.

1
Could I a thousand sceptres sway,

A subject still to thy controul,
Thy gentle laws I would obey,
And thou be monarch of my soul.

2
Or were I plac'd in highest state,

High as Ambition pants to be, The proud distinction I should hate,

Dear Henry, if not shar'd with thee.

XXII.

THE PARENT.
From the Dramatic Pastoral of ARCADIA.

BY ROBERT LLOYD.

1
With joy the Parent loves to trace
Resemblance in his children's face:
And, as he forms their docile youth
To walk the steady paths of truth,
Observes them shooting into men,
And lives in them life o'er again.

2
While active sons, with eager flame,
Catch virtue at their father's name;
When full of glory, full of age,
The Parent quits this busy stage,
What in the sons we most admire
Calls to new life the honour'd sire.

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1
Sav, mighty Love, and aid my song,
To whom thy sweetest joys belong,

And who the happy pairs,
Whose yielding hearts and joining hands,
Find blessings twisted with their bands
To soften all their cares ?

2
Not the wild herds of nymphs and swains,
That thoughtless fly into the chains,

As custom leads the way :
If there be bliss without design,
Ivies and oaks may grow and twine,

And be as blest as they.

3 Not sordid souls of earthly mould, Who, drawn by kindred charms of gold,

To dull embraces move!
So two rich mountains of Peru
May rush to wealthy marriage too,
And make a world of love.

4
Not minds of melancholy strain,
Still silent, or that still complain,

Can the dear bondage bless : As well may heav'nly concerts spring From two old lutes with ne'er a string, Or none beside the bass.

5 Nor can the soft endearments hold Two jarring souls of angry mould,

The rugged and the keen : Sampson's young foxes might as well In bands of cheerful wedlock dwell, With firebrands ty'd between.

6
Nor let the cruel fetters bind
A gentle to a savage mind,

For love abhors the sight:
Loose the fierce tiger from the deer,
For native rage and native fear

Rise and forbid delight.

Two kindest souls alone must meet ;
'Tis friendship makes the bondage sweet,

And feeds their mutual loves :
[Religion must light up the flame,
Their faith and practice be the same,

Best bliss on earth it proves.]

XXIV.

JOHN AND SUSAN.

BY THE REV, C. BUCKLE.

JOHN.

Come hither sweet Susan, and by me sit down, Let's consult how soon wedlock shall make thee

my own, For

you are my true love, my joy and my dear, prithee, Love, let us be married this year.

SUSAN.

I

pray honest John, do not think of such things, For marriage both trouble and care with it

brings,

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