The Death of Authentic Primitive Art: And Other Tales of Progress

Voorkant
University of California Press, 21 dec. 1998 - 309 pagina's
In this lucid, witty, and forceful book, Shelly Errington argues that Primitive Art was invented as a new type of art object at the beginning of the twentieth century but that now, at the century's end, it has died a double but contradictory death. Authenticity and primitivism, both attacked by cultural critics, have died as concepts. At the same time, the penetration of nation-states, the tourist industry, and transnational corporations into regions that formerly produced these artifacts has severely reduced supplies of "primitive art," bringing about a second "death."

Errington argues that the construction of the primitive in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries (and the kinds of objects chosen to exemplify it) must be understood as a product of discourses of progress—from the nineteenth-century European narrative of technological progress, to the twentieth-century narrative of modernism, to the late- twentieth-century narrative of the triumph of the free market. In Part One she charts a provocative argument ranging through the worlds of museums, art theorists, mail-order catalogs, boutiques, tourism, and world events, tracing a loosely historical account of the transformations of meanings of primitive art in this century. In Part Two she explores an eclectic collection of public sites in Mexico and Indonesia—a national museum of anthropology, a cultural theme park, an airport, and a ninth-century Buddhist monument (newly refurbished)—to show how the idea of the primitive can be used in the interests of promoting nationalism and economic development.

Errington's dissection of discourses about progress and primitivism in the contemporary world is both a lively introduction to anthropological studies of art institutions and a dramatic new contribution to the growing field of cultural studies.
 

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In this lucid, witty, and forceful book, Shelly Errington argues that Primitive Art was invented as a new type of art object at the beginning of the twentieth century but that now, at the century's ... Volledige review lezen

Inhoudsopgave

The Mets New Treasures
2
Good Art Matches the Sofa
3
PART
6
Better Worse and Earlier Later
13
The Metanarrative
15
The Metanarrative
17
A Stroll through the Natural History Museum
23
The Field Museum Chicago
25
Painting of Las Castas
183
The Cosmic Theme Park of the Javanese
188
Luxor HotelCasino Las Vegas
191
BigDuck Architecture
192
A BalineseStyle Arch at the Entrance of Taman Mini
193
GrandPlaceofImportance Audience Hall
194
at Taman Mini
196
Typical Houses at Taman Mini
198

Diorama of a Hunter in a Natural History Museum
27
A Pack of Brute Facts with Which One Cannot Argue
34
The Metanarrative
36
A Statue of LapuLapu the First Philippine Nationalist
39
Anonymous Cartoon on Oil Exploration
44
Three Ways to Tell the History of Primitive Art
49
Display Case of Art Decorative Art and Nonart
63
What Became Authentic Primitive Art?
70
Let s Lend Out the Olmec Head by Victoria Roberts
80
Gold Chest Ornaments from Sumba Indonesia
93
Postcards Announcing Gallery Shows
94
Beautiful Investments
100
Which Is More Authentic?
101
The Universality of Art as a SelfFulfilling Prophecy
102
Amazon Collection Brochure
114
The Death of Authentic Primitive Art
118
The Best Souvenirs of Indonesia Had Previous Owners
124
Flyer on Indonesian Artifacts Sale early 1990s
127
Tautau in Cliff at Lemo Tana Toraja 1975
130
To Make Sure Their Ancestors Get to Heaven the People of Torajaland Carry Them Halfway There
131
Cliff Balcony at Lemo
133
Authenticity Primitivism and Art Revisited
137
Gallery Brochure Showing Australian Aboriginal Art Acrylic on Canvas
140
Toraja Designs Are Now Applied to a Variety of Surfaces
148
The Evolution of Baskets of Leisure
152
PART
159
Teotihuacan Is Always the Antecedent of Tenochtitlan
165
Cuauhtemoc as the First Hero of the Mexican Nation
166
Stairs Lead up to the Realm of History
167
Mexican Basilica Architecture
169
Entrance to the National Museum of Anthropology Mexico
170
Ground Plan of the National Museum of Anthropology Mexico
171
Central Patio of the National Museum of Anthropology Mexico
172
Aztec Calendar Stone the National Museum of Anthropology Mexico
174
Ethnographic Display the National Museum of Anthropology Mexico
176
Peering from the SecondFloor Walkway to the Hall of Mexica the National Museum of Anthropology Mexico
177
A Tongkonan in Torajaland
202
The Tongkonan as Emblem of Identity
204
The Maranu Hotel Torajaland
205
Tongkonan Elements Added to Ordinary Structures
206
A Grand House with a TongkonanShaped Entrance
207
Javanese Pendopo
208
A JogloShaped Roof Tops the Dining Room of a Hotel in Torajaland
211
A JogloShaped Roof Covers a Seismograph in Borobudur
212
Borobudur in Miniature at Taman Mini
221
Joglosthe Roof of Choice at the HattaSukarno Airport
223
Walkways to Boarding Areas Refer to Pendopo Architecture at the HattaSukarno Airport
224
Airport Passenger Areas Topped with JogloStyle Roof
225
Gateway with a Balinese Theme
226
Making Progress on Borobudur
228
View of Borobudur from Above
233
Ground Plan of Borobudur
234
Vertical Crosssection of Borobudur
235
Stone Portal Guarded by Kala Figure Borobudur circa 1911
236
Borobudurs Upper Terraces and Central Stupa
237
Dagobs of Borobudurs Highest Terraces
238
Lower Terrace at Borobudur circa 1911
239
Highest Square Terrace at Borobudur
243
Illustration of Prambanan circa 1817
246
Borobudur in 1907
247
Closed from 800 a d to 1983 a d
248
Treelined Promenade Framing Vista of Borobudur
252
Palladios Teatro Olimpico
255
View from the Top of the Hancock Building Chicago
256
Teahouse at the Summit of Borobudur circa 1866
259
Tourists Climbing on Borobudur
261
Afterword
267
Notes
273
References
285
Index
301
Illustration Credits 309
Copyright

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Shelly Errington is Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Santa Cruz, author of Meaning and Power in a Southeast Asian Realm (1989), and coeditor of Power and Difference: Gender in Island Southeast Asia (1990).

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