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KEY.

GREENE.

UIILAND.

CRANCH.

291

F. S. KEY.

The Star-spangled Banner. The star-spangled banner, O long may it wave O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave!

ALBERT G. GREENE.

Old Grimes.
Old Grimes is dead ; that good old man,

We ne'er shall see him more:
He used to wear a long black coat,

All buttoned down before.

JOHN LOUIS UHLAND. The Passage. Translated by Mrs. Sarah Austin. Take, O boatman, thrice thy fee; Take, - I give it willingly; For, invisible to thee, Spirits twain have crossed with me.

CHRISTOPHER P. CRANCH.

Stanzas.
Thought is deeper than all speech;

Feeling deeper than all thought;
Souls to souls can never teach

What unto themselves was taught.

EATON STANNARD BARRETT.

1820.

Woman.
Not she with traitrous kiss her Master stung,
Not she denied him with unfaithful tongue ;
She, when apostles fled, could danger brave,
Last at his cross, and earliest at his grave.

MISS FANNY STEERS.

Song.
The last link is broken

That bound me to thee,
And the words thou hast spoken

Have rendered me free.

DAVID MALLET.

1700–1765.

Tyburn.
While tumbling down the turbid stream,
Lord love us, how we apples swim.

JOHN PHILIPS.

1676-1708. Splendid Shilling. Line 121. My galligaskins, that have long withstood The winter's fury and encroaching frosts, By time subdued, (what will not time subdue !) A horrid chasm disclosed.

THOMAS A KEMPIS.

1380–1471.

Imitation of Christ. Book i. Chapter 19. Man proposes, but God disposes.*

Book i. Chapter 23. And when he is out of sight, quickly also is he out of mind.

Book iïi. Chapter 12.
Of two evils, the less is always to be chosen.

FRANCIS RABELAIS.

1483-1553.

Translated by Urquhart and Motteux.

Book i. Chapter 1. Note 2. To return to our muttons

Book i. Chapter 5. To drink no more than a sponge.

Appetite comes with eating, says Angeston.

* This expression is of much greater antiquity; it appears in the Chronicle of Battel Abbey, from 1066 to 1176, page 27, Lower's Translation, and also in Piers' Ploughman's Vision,

line 13994.

Book i. Chapter 11. He looked a gift horse in the mouth.

By robbing Peter he paid Paul, . . . . . and hoped to catch larks if ever the heavens should fall.

He did make of necessity virtue.

Book iv. Chapter 23.
I'll go his halves.

Book iv. Chapter 24.
The Devil was sick, the Devil a monk would be ;
The Devil was well, the Devil a monk was he.

MIGUEL DE CERVANTES.

1547-1616.
Don Quixote. Translated by Jarvis.

Part i. Book iv. Ch. 20.
Every one is the son of his own works.

Part i. Book iv. Ch. 23. I would do what I pleased, and doing what I pleased, I should have my will, and having my will, I should be contented ; and when one is contented, there is no more to be desired; and when there is no more to be desiredi, there is an end of it.

Part ii. Book i. Ch. 4. Every one is as God made him, and oftentimes a great deal worse

Part ii. Book iy. Ch. 16. Blessings on him who invented sleep, the mantle that covers all human thoughts.

SIR PHILIP SIDNEY.

1554-1586.

The Defence of Poesy. He cometh unto you with a tale which holdeth children from play, and old men from the chimney-corner.

I never heard the old song of Percy and Douglass, that I found not my heart moved more than with a trumpet.

Arcadia. Book i. There is no man suddenly either excellently good, or extremely evil.

They are never alone that are accompanied with noble thoughts.

THOMAS HOBBES.

1588-1679.

The Leviathan. Part i. Chap. 4. For words are wise men's counters, they do but by them; but they are the money of fools.

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