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Statius, Theb. I. 212.

grave et immutabile fanatis Pondus adest verbis, ei vocem Fata sequuntur.

B. VIII. 2.

So charming left his voice, that he a while Thought him still speaking; ftill stood fix'd to hear.

Imitated probably from Apollonius, I. 512. See before, Remarks on Spenser, Page 184. The Thought was originally Homer's. 'Iliad. B. 40.

9 dein de

μιν αμφέχύτ' ομφή.

- divina autem ipsum circumfufa erat vox. • Lucian, Somn. Els your on Owun TWV QXovo Jevtov svævhos. and Socrates, in Plato's Crito; Kar Ev &uuOR αυτη η ηχη τουτων των λογων βομβει, και ποιει μη δυνασθαι

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while Shame, thou looking on, &c. Milton often uses the Nominative case absolute, as the Creeks do; which, whether it should be called a case absolute, or an ellipfis, we leave to the Grammarians to determine.

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Virgil, Georg. II. 463.

Nec varios inhiant pulchra testudine poftes.

v. 689.

The quarters of the north.

Sannazarius, de Partu Virginis, III. 40.

Vos, quum omne arderet Cælum servilibus armis,
Aretoumque furor pertenderet impius axem
Scandere, et in gelidos regnum transferre Triones,
Fida manus mecum manfiftis.

There are other passages in the fame poem, of which Milton has made use.

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B. VI. 5524

in hollow Cube Training his devilish enginry. I knew one, who ufed to think it fhould be hollow Tube: To which it may be objected, that Enginry, (Machinæ,) are the hollow Tubes, or Guns, themselves.

B. VII. 173

and what I will, is Fate.

Statius

Statius, Theb. I. 212.

grave et immutabile fan&tis Pondus adest verbis, et vocem Fata sequuntur.

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So charming left his voicè, that he a while Thought him still speaking; ftill stood fix'd to hear.

Imitated probably: from Apollonius, I. 512. See before, Remarks on Spenser, Page 184. The Thought was originally Homer's. 'Iliad. B. 40.

Jein de

μιν αμφίχύτ' ομφή.

divina autem ipsum circumfufa erat vox. • Lucian, Somn. El your noun TW axovo LEYTA svauros · and Socrates, in Plato's Crito; Kæı ev sjuos αυτη η ηχη τουτων των λογων βομβει, και ποιει μη δυνασθαι των αλλων ακέειν, .

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while Shame, thou looking on, &c. Milton often uses the Nominative case absolute, as the Creeks do; which, whether it should be called a cafe absolute, or an ellipfis, we leave to the Grammarians to determine.

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B. X. 304.

From hence a paffage, broad, Smooth, easy, inoffensive down to hell. Alluding perhaps to Virgil, Æn. VI. 126. Facilis defcenfus Averni: or, to the Paths of Wickedness, as in Hefiod, Epy. I. 285.

Τήν μένοι κακότητα και λαδόν έσιν ελέσθαι
Ρηιδίως: ολίγη μεν [λειη] έδες, μάλα δ' εγγύθι νάιει.

v. 655.

from the south to bring Solftitial summer's heat. The ancient Poets represent the south as the region of heat. Statius, Theb. I. 160.

-- aut Boreâ gelidas, madidive tepentes

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Igne Noti.

Lucan, I. 54. very extravagantly;

Nec polus averħ calidus quâ vergitur Austri.

V. 1007.

She ended here

so much of death her thoughts Had entertain’d, as dy'd her cheeks with pale.

Virgil,

Virgil, Æn. IV. 499.

Hæc effata, filet : Pallor fimul occupat ora.

B. XI. 564.

In other part stood one, who at the forge
Lab'ring, two maffy clods of iron and brass
Had melted, (whether found where casual fire
Had wasted woods, on mountain or in vale,
Down to the veins of earth; thence gliding hot, &c.
From Lucretius, V, 1 240.

Quod fupereft, æs atque aurum, &c.
See hereafter, in Vol. 11. Remarks on Lucretius.

II.

PARADISE REGAINED.

PRELIMINARY OBSERVATION

This Poem of Milton has not met with the

approbation that it deserves. It has not the harmony of numbers, the sublimity of thought, and the beauties of diction, which are in Paradise Loft. It is composed in a lower and less striking style, a style suited to the subject. Artful sophistry, false reasoning, set off in the most specious manner, and

refuted

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