Creationism and Its Critics in Antiquity

Voorkant
University of California Press, 2008 - 291 pagina's
1 Recenseren
The world is configured in ways that seem systematically hospitable to life forms, especially the human race. Is this the outcome of divine planning or simply of the laws of physics? Ancient Greeks and Romans famously disagreed on whether the cosmos was the product of design or accident. In this book, David Sedley examines this question and illuminates new historical perspectives on the pantheon of thinkers who laid the foundations of Western philosophy and science. Versions of what we call the "creationist" option were widely favored by the major thinkers of classical antiquity, including Plato, whose ideas on the subject prepared the ground for Aristotle's celebrated teleology. But Aristotle aligned himself with the anti-creationist lobby, whose most militant members the atomists sought to show how a world just like ours would form inevitably by sheer accident, given only the infinity of space and matter. This stimulating study explores seven major thinkers and philosophical movements enmeshed in the debate: Anaxagoras, Empedocles, Socrates, Plato, the atomists, Aristotle, and the Stoics."
  

Wat mensen zeggen - Een recensie schrijven

We hebben geen recensies gevonden op de gebruikelijke plaatsen.

Verwante boeken

Inhoudsopgave

I
1
II
8
III
11
IV
13
V
14
VI
20
VII
25
VIII
26
XXIII
127
XXIV
133
XXV
139
XXVI
150
XXVII
155
XXVIII
167
XXIX
173
XXX
181

IX
31
X
33
XI
52
XII
60
XIII
70
XIV
72
XV
75
XVI
78
XVII
86
XVIII
89
XIX
93
XX
98
XXI
107
XXII
113
XXXI
186
XXXII
194
XXXIII
203
XXXIV
205
XXXV
210
XXXVI
212
XXXVII
225
XXXVIII
231
XXXIX
239
XL
245
XLI
257
XLII
267
Copyright

Overige edities - Alles weergeven

Veelvoorkomende woorden en zinsdelen

Bibliografische gegevens