Silence Unheard: Deathly Otherness in Patanjala-Yoga

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SUNY Press, 2002 - Philosophy - 156 pages
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Silence Unheard maintains that the reality of PatanÅjali’s Yogasuμtra is a profound silence barely and variously audible to the scholars and interpreters who approach it. Even the Yogasuμtra itself is an “approach,” a voice articulating an other— a silent, beyond-speech yogin. Author Yohanan Grinshpon presents PatanÅjali as a Saμn3khya-philosopher, who interprets silence in accordance with his own dualist metaphysics and Buddhistic sensibilities. The Yogasuμtra represents an intellectual’s conceptualization of utter otherness rather than the yogin’s verbalization of silence. Silence Unheard focuses on the yogin’s supra-normal experiences (siddhis) as well as on the classification of silences and the ultimate goal of disintegration through gun|a balance. The book provides a translation of the Yogasuμtra divided into two sections: an essential text, concerning the yoga practitioner, and a secondary text, concerning the philosopher. Grinshpon also surveys the encounters of intellectuals, scholars, seekers, devotees, and outsiders with the Yogasuμtra.
  

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may 13th

Contents

Challenges of an Oxymoronic Genre
1
Eight Characters in Search of the Yogasiitra The Lively Banalization of Yogic Deathly Silence
13
Daily Life in Samadhi The Dying Yogins Real Life and a Plea for Holistic Presentation of the Yogasutra
37
The Yogasutra and the Dying Yogins Lively Interior
53
Causality False Linearity and the Silent Yogins Presence in the Yogasutra
65
Untying the Knot of Existence Liberation Deathly Silence and Their Interpretation in PatanjalaYoga
79
The Dying Yogins Challenge Homelessness and Truth
91
The Essential Yogasutra An Exercise in Rereading as Rewriting
95
Notes
123
Bibliography
147
Index
153
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About the author (2002)

Yohanan Grinshpon is Lecturer in Indian Studies at Hebrew University in Jerusalem.

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